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My quick thoughts, back stage, and rants as I try to Teach kids about the Web while learning how to help others build a better Web.

jgregorymcverry.com

networkedlearningcollaborative.com

Greg McVerry

Give a kid a blog and watch them become content creators. Give them a Domain and watch them create an identity.

Greg McVerry

Teachers need to model what it means to have your own domain and publish on your own site. The pre-teaching before app is a mindset

Greg McVerry

After and some initial research I believe the time is ripe for the movement to embrace basic standards and create documentation that encourages learning resources to be the plainest html possible.

Small HTML files are the most universal, the most accessible, and the least data costly. Shared standards are a issue.

Also listening back to @opencontent keynote comparing purists and pragmatists...The differences wouldn't matter if we had open standards. (my draft ideas: http://quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com/2018/05/07/microformats-i-would-like-in-remixable-indieweb-...)

Yet I also fear an "new wine old bottle" problem with emergence of tools. Why are we building things only machines can read? If we continue down this route maybe some of Dave's darker questions come true. Again some simple standards around html markup and a community push can help ensure open stays open.

Greg McVerry

This is what I am exploring.

For academics in our spaces whose , , , , philosophies align with principles would the tools like MicroPub and MicroSub and standards like webmentions not only make tracking the spread of our stuff, but more importantly encouraging the spread and spirit, without recreating another silo. Regardless of how open?

The OER Commons tools look promising and we would need stuff like that for most educators but I was trying to figure out what a DIY approach could look like as well.