Skip to main content

My quick thoughts, back stage, and rants as I try to Teach kids about the Web while learning how to help others build a better Web.

jgregorymcverry.com

networkedlearningcollaborative.com

Greg McVerry

Give a kid a blog and watch them become content creators. Give them a Domain and watch them create an identity.

Greg McVerry

Teachers need to model what it means to have your own domain and publish on your own site. The pre-teaching before app is a mindset

Greg McVerry

After and some initial research I believe the time is ripe for the movement to embrace basic standards and create documentation that encourages learning resources to be the plainest html possible.

Small HTML files are the most universal, the most accessible, and the least data costly. Shared standards are a issue.

Also listening back to @opencontent keynote comparing purists and pragmatists...The differences wouldn't matter if we had open standards. (my draft ideas: http://quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com/2018/05/07/microformats-i-would-like-in-remixable-indieweb-...)

Yet I also fear an "new wine old bottle" problem with emergence of tools. Why are we building things only machines can read? If we continue down this route maybe some of Dave's darker questions come true. Again some simple standards around html markup and a community push can help ensure open stays open.

Greg McVerry

@film_girl I just saw in @ConcentricSky's @BadgrTeam announcement that @Microsoft is
an partner.

If you know the right people tell em we said thanks. They're good people

This and more importantly the IoT backbone. One might have to say that is strategy

Greg McVerry

This is what I am exploring.

For academics in our spaces whose , , , , philosophies align with principles would the tools like MicroPub and MicroSub and standards like webmentions not only make tracking the spread of our stuff, but more importantly encouraging the spread and spirit, without recreating another silo. Regardless of how open?

The OER Commons tools look promising and we would need stuff like that for most educators but I was trying to figure out what a DIY approach could look like as well.

Greg McVerry

@altmetric I am currently thinking about microformats and my online classes. I am trying to encourage peers (since we all teach the same classes) to apply technologies to a philosophy and share and remix our courses.

Trying to be forward thinking about how we could track the metrics of remixes of learning materials using micorformats and webmentions.

Wanted to see if there are protocols @altmettic already uses for marking up courses, modules, lessons. I also could be way off thinking we should have h-entry classes for things like (objective, EQs, task, assessment, criteria, evidence, etc)

Greg McVerry

#OER and #indieweb

1 min read

Not sure if anyone else is thinking about how compatible technologies can help and but here is a great California grant opportunity. https://www.asccc.org/sites/default/files/IV.%20B.%20%282%29%20CCCOERI%20Proposal%20Draft%20-%20Janu...

Greg McVerry

My Next #indieweb task

2 min read

So I got my blogs (well the ones I use a lot) updated and running smoothly. I was looking for my next project and I have decided I am going to focus on streamlining my course workflow and also utilizing microformats when makring up my courses.

Here's my problem. I try to host all my courses in html/css. It makes remixing and sharing so much easier than locking htem behind a unverisity silo. I then also try and mantain these on GitHub.

Things quickly fall out of sync. My syllabus, my course site, and my repos are never the same.

Here is my solution: Create a system where I can update a course module template and this will immediatley update both my website and my syllabus.

Be really cool if I could do this right from my repo. If not I can just sftp into my sites to update.

I really want to to do this because I am intrigued by altmetrics. A solution like that has been a dream of our alt.pub study group.

Quick punchlist:

  • Update frameworks. Syllabus uses Skelteon and classes use Bootstrap. Probably make them both Bootstrap,
  • Change all the font awesome icons to 5.0.
  • Figure out when using microformats if there are already conventions used in and learning spaces.
  • Finalize my instructional design for my modules. I am really close but this work will be important for next steps.
  • Figure out best way to serve up the modules in html. Here I am at the edge of my knowledge. Should be fun.

Greg McVerry

@PeggySemingson @peggysemingson have you seen Wavelength with micro.blog integration: http://www.manton.org/2018/04/wavelength-for-micro-blog.html $10 a month for a platform built on that can be easily used for classes. Except for the app only working on an inferior operating system (kidding Android always sucked at audio editing until very recently...but I don't teach rich kids) it looks super promising.

I have never assigned a book in any class that wasn't openly available (unless department req) but I am thinking of trying micro.blog subscriptions with podcasting. Be $50 a semester or so (going on five months) per student.

Though I would lose the domains of Own's One aspect. Would still need a static homepage, profile pages, etc that I have students build now in Wordpress.