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Greg McVerry

Writing with Observations #EDU407Sum19 #clmooc

2 min read

When we write we often capture what we observe. Scientist write formal observations. Mathematicians may observe patterns. Literary experts see poetry. Each discipline takes its own spin, but the basic skill remains.

Every writer should carry an observation notebook.  In fact journaling may improve student writing and positive perceptions of learning  (Connor-Greene, 2000). Yoru journal maybe a blog but the best authors never pockets empty of pens and paper.

Jot what you see.

Types of Observation Posts

An observation post can also provide a blogger stuck without an idea. Just look around and pcik something, jot down a few ideas in your notebook, and then write a post.

Ordinary Object

Choose an ordinary object like a pencil or a coffee cup. Describe it in great detail. For a challenge choose a metaphor or emotion to with the object.  Stare at your piece. Write down even the most minute details. Go to your blog and draft the post.

Take a Walk

Go outside. Every ten minutes stop for one minute and jot down what you see. Or just fall down, gaze up at the sky, and write.

Extraordinary Objects

Pick weird stuff. Jot down and share your description. 

Text Structure

Ever notice how the angles in YouTube videos change quickly and without transitions? These are called jump cuts. Pick a genre you are unfamiliar with and observe the text structure.

Time Lapse

Pick the same subject. Write about it in some time interval for a set period of time.

 

 Connor-Greene, P. A. (2000). Making connections: Evaluating the effectiveness of journal writing in enhancing student learning. Teaching of Psychology, 27(1), 44-46., P. A. (2000). Making connections: Evaluating the effectiveness of journal writing in enhancing student learning. Teaching of Psychology, 27(1), 44-46.

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