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Greg McVerry

How to Write Your #Literacies Mantra #edu407

Mantras, a sanskrit word, derives from meditation practices of Hinduism and Bhuddisum. These short phrases, represent universal truths people use to focus their minds away

2 min read

Mantras, a sanskrit word, derives from meditation practices of Hinduism and Bhuddisum. These short phrases, represent universal truths people use to focus their minds away from the material.

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"Mantra" by A literacy mantra repesents your worldview to how we and children learn to read and write. Your epistemological views, what you think about knowledge, and ontologogical views, how you see the world will influence your classroom.

Do you center knowledge in the indiviudal? Is reading a set of discrete skills that must be taught? How much agency and voice do we allow students to project?

Develop theย  powerful phrase that captures what your classroom will look like.

How to Write your Mantra

Brainstorm

Begin by brainstorming jot down a lit of words of what will be important to you as a classroom teacher. You could also look to mentor texts and find ideas in educational philosophers, underline key phrases.

Sort

Once you have collected yoru words or phrases sort them by categories. You want to get down to no more than three or four key ideas.

Identify the Universal Truths

Examine yoru categories for universal truths. What holds for every child? Every classroom? You want to use active words that provide you with direction. A mantra you can repeate each day with your morning coffeee.

Include supporting evidence

Once you have written your mantra share it in a journal entry or a blog post. Then include supporting evidence to prove your mantra includes universal truths. This last step will be an ongoing practice. It may even shift your mantra. That is fine, no rule can be a rule, and set in stone. That is the only rule.

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