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My quick thoughts, back stage, and rants as I try to Teach kids about the Web while learning how to help others build a better Web.

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Greg McVerry

Four Haikus remixed from the @gltich Haiku generator https://glitch.com/~haiku-generator by @jonobr1 #poetryport last haiku mine as feedback

Four Haikus remixed from the @gltich Haiku generator https://glitch.com/~haiku-generator by @jonobr1 #poetryport last haiku mine as feedback
Four Haikus remixed from the @gltich Haiku generator https://glitch.com/~haiku-generator by @jonobr1 #poetryport last haiku mine as feedback
Four Haikus remixed from the @gltich Haiku generator https://glitch.com/~haiku-generator by @jonobr1 #poetryport last haiku mine as feedback
Four Haikus remixed from the @gltich Haiku generator https://glitch.com/~haiku-generator by @jonobr1 #poetryport last haiku mine as feedback

The present errand

reeking in the tranquil tale

is nodding elsewhere

 

The discrete swordfish

melting hte keyless cap

is flirting northward

 

The jobless retstraint

chucking in the quilted ink

is owning steeply

 

The secret sophmore

mixing in the inverse ink

is scaring sparsely

 

No articles please

the power of THE tiny

in face of real words

Greg McVerry

Greg McVerry

My Goal for Next Semester is to improve the quality and frequency of my feedback. Here is a concept map of my research.

My Goal for Next Semester is to improve the quality and frequency of my feedback. Here is a concept map of my research.

As instructors we have our greatest impact on learning through feedback (Ching et al., 2015). As teachers our feedback provides students with a “knowledge of results” (Flemin and Levine, 1978). When you communicate to students on how they have demonstrated growth following an assessment or task you allow them to self-reflect on progress, address lingering misconceptions, and set new learning goals (Black & William, 2016; Price, 1997).

We know feedback drives learning (Azevedo & Bernard, 1995; Hattie, 2011; Shute, 2007). In it’s most basic form feedback should, “(a) verify whether the student’s answer is right or wrong and (b) provide information to the learner about the correct response” (Shute, 2007, p.8). Yet we also know proving students with positive an actionable feedback beyond their answer extends learning by requiring metacognition, or making the student think about how they think (Swan, 1983). This type of goal directed feedback improves motivation to learn (Dempsey et al., 1993) and encourages a Growth Mindset (Dweck ,1986).

In our online classes you need to not only ensure your feedback is effective, but you need to also help students to use the feedback. Luckily there are new technological tools that increase the efficacy and efficiency of a well designed feedback loop (Gee, 2017).

Effective feedback

Feedback improves learning (Dweck, 2007; Hattie, 2011) and in our online classes the growth statements we give to students effect both motivation and community (Northrup, 2011).If students feel you do not read your posts or that their work is not valued they will not utilize the information for personal growth. As teachers we need to ensure we provide timely and actionable, feedback.

Timely

Frequent and immediate feedback has the greatest effect on learning (Fink 2013). When examining the effect sizes of automated quizzes those that provide students feedback immediately have shown to improve learning when compared to delayed feedback (Northrup, 2011). The same is true of your written feedback. The sooner students get feedback the sooner they can make connections to content and develop personal learning goals. In fact getting frequent feedback early in the first two weeks helps to ensure students excel in your class (Conrad & Donalson, 2012; Rovai, 2002)

Targeted

Feedback also needs to be targeted, which means it is focused on improvement driven from your stated learning objectives. Students then use the information in a process centered (Coffied et al., 2014) way to learn through reflection. By having students use growth statements as they think about revisions, goals and progress they make knowledge gains toward your stated learning objectives.

Actionable

Finally students need to use feedback. Therefore as an instructor you must make your growth statements actionable. This means focusing language on goals and not the students (Shute, 2007). The student did not “miss a question” they did not demonstrate mastery of the concept. Explain to the students what they need to do in order to succeed next time. Emphasize the goal for the next time they need to apply the concept or allow revision (Duncan, 2007).

Positive Language

The positive language of your growth statements matter (Dweck, 2007). Research has consistently found non-punitive and positive messages lead to learning gains. In fact without you providing praise to how students are progressing and not including steps they can take to meet goal or take their learning to the next level students may not know they are growing (Coffield, et a., 2014)

Greg McVerry

@brownellcassie Just changed the prompt for the final week of my class thanks Jim!! #lra19 (text of screenshot available on the full post for people using screen readers)

@brownellcassie Just changed the prompt for the final week of my class thanks Jim!! #lra19 (text of screenshot available on the full post for people using screen readers)

Read

Gunning Chapter 13

Write

What are the goals and objectives for your language arts classroom. Post yours and then comment on the goals of your peers.

Need somewhere to start try:

  • What do you imagine your teaching practices to be?
  • How will your teaching practices change the world?
  • How can we make this journey together?

 (Hoffman 2019)

Participate

Let's work on those portfolios. Get your lesson plans done and add your assessments....really begin with how you want to measure growth. In the space or the reader?? Why do we will always say The student will be able to...Maybe it should be the space of learning will encourage....

Objectives and Assessment

As I said all semester. Maybe our learning spaces and not our students should be the variable of interest. That being said you will need to submit to EdTPA, it is a lesson plan genre designed to meet institutional, not learner,  needs.So this activity helps to scaffold that understanding.

Rubrics

So use my feedback and keep a tight association between your measures of growth and your stated objectives. Make your you derive those objectives from grade level expectations.I also, and you know ,I refuse to rubricize everything, ask you to submit a rubric for each lesson plan. This is to make sure I can tell you know assessment techniques and how to design criterion and/or scales.

Differentiation

Another common pattern I am noticing as I work on video feedback is differentiation. You are well skilled at modifying instruction based on student differences. In this class I want you to focus on just CONTENT differentiation. Not because you would do this in the real world...you wouldn't but I need to ensure your own knowledge growth around expectations of teaching literature.

 

Greg McVerry

Dissecting a WordPress #IndieWeb Post

Dissecting a WordPress #IndieWeb Post

Here is the first draft of my effort to dissect what an WordPress post looks like in the wild.

If youy begin by installing the plug-in and then following the how to included guide I belive this is what happens under the hood.

Open to feedback. And new finepoint sharpies.

CLMOOC

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