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Greg McVerry

Agency, Argumentation, and Blogging

2 min read

Calls to bridge cognitive and social practices when teaching Argumentation. (Reznitskaya & Anderson, 2002) developed Argument Schema Theory. Beach and What's their name (year) called for an integration (cite that). We continue this effort by building our theory of change on the concept of argumentation as discourse.

Argumentation as Discourse

Teaching students the norms of academic writing remains one of the most consistent challenges for teachers of the English language arts. The earliest comprehensive studies of writing instruction at the high school level suggested that most students were taught highly formulaic structures for producing academic argument (Applebee & Langer, 2013, Hillocks, 1986), and that trend has remained consistent over time (Applebee and Langer, Newell et al., 2015). Teaching and learning academic argument, especially in middle and high school settings, often is reduced to formulaic essay structures. In fact, Newell et al’s work (dervied from an IES grant project) suggests that

To clarify: what counts as argumentative writing, indeed what counts as argumentation more generally, is not a given. It is not something that just exists. It is instead a set of social practices deeply embedded in our everyday lives and the social institutions in which we all participate. It is socially constructed through and exists only through teaching and learning (Newell 1)

It is this set of socially constructed teaching practices related to argument writing that we aim to upend by providing students with a domain of their own to write, give and receive feedback, and critically evaluate outside web sources when creating their own arguments.

Writer Efficacy, Agency, and Identity

self-efficacy

agency

identity

Dialogical Discourse

double talk

Community of Writers

community is essential to process writing (Applebee & Langer, 2013; Graham, Fitzgerald, Friedrich, Greene, Kim, & Booth Olson, 2016; Graham, & Perin, 2007; NCTE, 2016; Troia & Olinghouse, 2013; Zemelmann, & Daniels, 1988). Moreover, in writing communities outside of school, community drives all learning (Winn). We believe we have to intentionally design hybrid writing spaces that traverse both the classroom and the lived digital lives of our youth. This study seeks to understand t

Integrating Empirical Research into Phase One

Operationalizing Empirical Research in Phase One

Greg McVerry

Responses on XMCA listserv on question of Implicit and Explicit Knowledge

6 min read

In reply to My convulted stream

Hi Greg,

This question and distinction originally interested me when I was trying to work out what intuition is. "Implicit" hides a variety of meanings and sense, whereas explicit is narrower in range and can be connoted with sign, and hence this aspect can be linked with Vygotsky.  To the extent that I have studied Peirce, his object and interpretant seem to have agreement too.


From wikipedia: "Tolman also promoted the concept known as latent learning first coined by Blodgett (1929)"
Polanyi (1958) referred to tacit knowledge quite extensively.  There were a number of other authors that I read contemporary with Polanyi.

P. I. Zinchenko's (1939) study on voluntary and involuntary learning gives experimental accounts of these two different methods of learning.

Best,
Huw

On the hunt

Keith Johnson, one of the professors on my MA at University of Essex,used the distinction between implicit and explicit on the one hand, and the J.R. Anderson model of DECPRO, PRODEC on the other. He didn't say anything about conditional knowledge, but from Anderson I gather it's something to do with the passive reception/active production distinction (that we Halllidayans reject). 
I never heard him use both of them together, in a matrix, so that there was implicit and explicit declarative knowledge, implicit and explicit procedural knowledge, and implicit and explicit conditional knowledge. But Keith was very GRAMMATICAL. It seems to me that if you apply it to PHONOLOGY, there isn't any reason we can't talk about implicit and explicit declarative knowledge (knowing THAT a sound is a /d/ and not a /t/ implicitly and being able to express that idea in phonological terms) and it is also possible to talk about implicit and explicit procedural knowledge (knowing HOW to distinguish them without thinking about it, and knowing HOW they are distinguished by the movements of the articulators). I don't see any reason in principle why you couldn't do the same thing with conditional knowledge either, although I'm not really sure that all these distinctions are relevant to teaching. 
All of this, and a lot more, in his 19i96 book Skill Learning and Language Teaching (Blackwell).
David KelloggSangmyung University

New Article: Han Hee Jeung & David Kellogg (2019): A story without SELF: Vygotsky’s
pedology, Bruner’s constructivism and Halliday’s construalism in understanding narratives byKorean children, Language and Education, DOI: 10.1080/09500782.2019.1582663To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/09500782.2019.1582663
Some e-prints available at:https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/KHRxrQ4n45t9N2ZHZhQK/full?target=10.1080/09500782.2019.1582663
All of this is in his 1996 book Skill Learning and Language Teaching (Blackwell). Greg,
I'm not sure about implicit *knowledge*, but the earliest studies on implicit *learning* were conducted by Arthur Reber in the 1960s. I had the good fortune of being a graduate student at CUNY Graduate Center in Developmental Psychology in the 1980s when Arthur was there as a visiting scholar. He was studying implicit learning of *grammar* by adults and children. What struck me about the phenomenon (then and now) is that subjects in experiments are unaware that they are engaged in implicit learning - and when asked to think about the task they are performing while they are learning to infer patterns implicitly, their performance deteriorates significantly. It would seem that implicit and explicit learning are activities that conflict with each other.

This info may not be at all relevant to your question, but I thought I should mention it.
Cheers,PeterI think you'd need to qualify that statement, Peter, for it to be correct.
The use of the phrase "involuntary" in P. I. Zinchenko's work pertains to "without volition" rather than "against one's volition".
Best,Huw

mike cole

Jun 14, 2019, 1:05 PM (3 days ago)
   
 

The same distinction can be found usefully in the work of Giyoo Hatano which you might find useful,Greg. A distinction is found in Wright's book on Envisioning Real Utopias between ideologyand culture.
Odd query:  Earth worms have an enormous effect on their environments and hence ours. Earth worms could not do this if they did not have "wiggle room." Would you attribute thetunnels and soil transformation of earth worms to them "having" agency? 

Also, I believe Palermo and Weiner made this distinction in the late 70s.  I would check their classic textbook on cognitive psychology (if it’s still around.)  And, Polanyi addressed these issues too.  Best, ag

 

Artin Goncu, Ph.D

Professor, Emeritus

University of Illinois at Chicago

www.artingoncu.com/

Can the earthworms consider the consequences of wiggiling this way or that and predicting the consequences of these choices or do they follow an almost programmatic biological following. If so is this agency and still learning in emodoed ways? 
I do keep a worm box those worms are more than cared for but not free? Are they missing agency?
----------I think I will disagree. Bits of explicit learning embedded into implicit events when you have explicit goals make a difference.
Meaning in the two spaces I am studying and people engage in explicit learning all the time. They need to make a gif or learn CSS. 
Yet other times folks muck about trying new things.
In each of these events people may have an overarching goal... As I type I am drawn to Dewey and Art and Experience. 
I do find embedding skills in a passion whrn I teach web development is key. Is Passion implicit learning or the most explicit imaginable?

Yes, when there is even flow, you feel entirely free, its our way or the highway. :-)And yes to dewey!

mike

Kind of why I wish I did not have to name things. Just say they "learn" then we don't cut knowledge off to the world.
I am going to try to grab thos thread and concurrent threads on Twitter and try to mix them together 
Thank you to all, All the books in thread requested through my library. 

 

Vygotsky showed in his work on child development (Problem of Age, for example) that the will is not born free all at once, and is in fact never free absolutely. Hegel gives us an extended discourse on free will in The Philosophy of Right, beginning with the transformation of the 'natural will' into the 'free will' with the creatures who use culture to control their own activity. But is takes social transformation to take the will beyond a Spinozan/Stoic resignation.

Nature-given drives and culture-given norms do not cancel freedom of will absolutely, but I think it makes no sense to talk about "agency" or freedom of the will other than actions passing through consciousness, with or without conscious awareness. But of course, if you are an Althusserian or Foucauldian, "agency" is taken in the sense of being the unwitting agent transmitting a disease, under which meaning, the earthworm has as much agency as Napoleon.

Andy

https://www.ethicalpolitics.org/ablunden/pdfs/Article_on_Teleology.pdf

Greg McVerry

Using my Commonplace Book to Write an Article

4 min read

  • Did a ton of research
  • Came up with ideas as I bookmarked sources and took notes on those bookmarks
  • I jotted quick outline
  • I switched to just bookmarks
  • I looked for Blunden searching for a Blunden article, I then searched for capital and found it. Might want to consider bookmarking by author as well.
  • https://quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com/content/bookmarkedpages?q=capital
  • I got distracted by a YouTube video
  • I shut down all my chats: Slack, Twitter, IRC, Telegram.
  • I went back to my text editor to look at the my outline
  • emailed XMCA listserv for chasing down explicit and implicit knowledge
  • I got distracted by a response from twitter customer service. I hate email

Hello all,

I am carrying on my quest to rethink cognitive apprenticeships into agentive apprenticeships for my work around innovation systems: https://quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com/2019/03/07/my-fork-of-synea-into-a-saint
Agentive apprenticeships defer more in centering the agency and choice in the learner in a network of shared interest where the space and tools teach much as any person.

You may recall I originally asked for ideas around knowledge brokering as it did not sit well with me. I decided to go with Knowledge Knitting as my metaphor. It is used frequently in the OER Community and amongst under represented scholars and if I can get the pictures out of my head and into words it will make sense.
But I am trying to chase down when the distinction between explicit and implicit knowledge began. It weaves through all apprenticeship research up through and including Gee's work on Affinity Spaces.
I am more trained in the cognitive narrative that dominates reading instruction today of declarative, procedural, and conditional knowledge.

Two questions:-When did the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge begin?-Are you aware of works that describe knowing in both implicit and explicit and in declarative, procedural, and conditional knowledge.

Greg

Thurs 9:21

Fri 6:42

Monday 11:45

  • copy and pasted all the responses from the XMCA listserv to my website. Need to go back and close the blockqoutes. Known WYSWIG like most make a muck of HTML, especailly when copy pasting
  • Copy and pasted all the tweets about knowledge knitting

Monday 12:45

  • took a lunch break and had to get kids off to camp
  • open up my outline and try to spend some time drafting.

Friday June 19 10:30am

  • lost original outline and notes in text editot
  • returned to Collins, Browns , and Duguid for quick refresh
  • took notes comparing the two.

Fridat June 12:00 pm

  • went back to technical reports. examined the prompts used to improve student writing. Really we were modeling internal dialogue? What does this mean for machine readable stuff?
  • Much of the focus on strategy use, the individual, and not the space that is a key difference.
  • Notes at time

Greg McVerry

Exploring the History of Reading Research in 30 minutes

2 min read

bunch of religions wanted some folks to read and wouldn't let others. Books mad expensive. Literacy always been about power and reading a tool to both take and give.

then a bunch of psychologist looked into reading brought in garbage with us today from Kantian humanism, positivism, and other crap that gets education in the way of learning

Then the computer ushered in the era of information processing and people thought the brain was like a file system and you had to move stuff from short term memory to long term memory.

Skills and strategy instruction formulated.

through the 1970's-1990's reading as skill and strategies was a big thing.  Vygotsky and Piaget start to have their mark.

Metacognition becomes a thing in 19770-1978

Palisncar and Brown come with reciprocal teaching which really ushers in strategy instruction. All the studies have a ceiling effect and a lack of transfer. Shocking, when you have students practice how to summarize a text they are really good at summarizing THAT text. Give them a book on astrophysics...not so much...summarizing as strategy use did not exist.

The reading wars were a thing with bunch of folks fighting over how to teach reading between phonics and whole language. It was (is) stupid. Toxic masculinity seeping into higher ed. Shocking.

Then around 1994-1995 multicultural education became a thing for a hot minute (this was before cultural proactive pedagogy, responsive teaching, restorative justice....people were way more open with their racism then. 

Dr. Au started doing amazing work in anthropology and reading. Psychology began to look as activity theory. Post modern literary and post structural theories took root.

Folks sometimes call these socio-cultural views of learning. I stick with being human.

So from 1994-1999 everyone had to read a book with a black kid in it. Waaay important but unrelated to what Dr. Au wanted us to take away about local pracies

We started talking learner agency, inquiry and out of school literacies? What is the difference between literacy and literacies? Dunno but folks wrote books on it, naming things pays bills.

Then the web came and changed everything and nothing.

Greg McVerry

A successful Homebrew Website Club New Haven

2 min read

Creating a learnign space on campus for students and alumni to gather to share their experiences has enriched my online teaching and provided students with an avenue for agency and artisty

On 2019-02-06 the local New Haven Homebrew Website Club met. As part of the global movement we join together to hack on websites. For many of my students this means building a site for the first time. For @SCSU alumni who attend they carry the website they began as students out in the real world and bring examples of how they use their sites in their classrooms.

New Name

At Wednesday's meeting we did decide a few things. Participants do not connect with the Homebrew Website Club. They do not know the history of the computer club once attended by Jobs and Gates and do not really care once they learn. So after some discussion we decided to revert our name back to the Elm City Webmakers. We will still host homebrew websiote club meetings but will brand these gatherings of the Elm City Webmakers.

Great Location

picture of room

Huge shout out to Dean Hegedus for building the active learnign lab where we meet. Today I was joined in person by two people. Natalie Caldwell, a student, and Drew McWeeney, an almuni

Awesome Goals

Natalie began byworking on her WordPress.com site. She wanted to learn how to add Bridgy and then to customize fonts and colors. Natalie even played with a bit of microformats

Drew came to the Elm City Webmaker gathering to work on his Grav site. Drew is working on instructional design for the American Red Cross. After discussing why he was using Grav for whta was a single webpage we decided to roll up opur sleeves and learn to spin up a web page by writing HTML.

Overall a great first meeting this month. I am looking forward to seeing even more people in two weeks.

Greg McVerry

Submitted Application for the @Mozilla Responsible Computer Science Challenge

21 min read

Concept Description:

 

The Computer Science Department, Research Center on Computing and Society, and School of Education at Southern Connecticut State University propose this work to fund the creation of a Virtual Reality recording and editing studio, with accompanying coursework on storytelling and WebVR.

Specifically, this project will fund the creation of the VR lab and openly licensed pedagogical materials other computer science departments could use to learn ethics, WebVR , or both. Through these courses students will create scalable, remixable content around issues of ethics in computer science in order to leave our program understanding of ethics as a first-design principle.

The project will proceed in two stages. The Responsible Computer Science Challenge award will fund the first stage. During the first stage we will develop the animation and WebVR lab as well as the curriculum. Successful results of this stage will lead us to seek follow up funding to design a dual-purpose Virtual Reality live recording studio while maintaining planetarium functionality.

Stage One, funded by the Responsible Computer Science Challenge, is a formative design research project that revolves around the  pedagogical goal of understanding how perspectives, history, and personality shape ethics and technology. We will develop a class cross listed in philosophy and computer science will teach digital storytelling through narratives of ethics and revise computer science classes in web design and security to include WebVR.

SCSU  is uniquely qualified for this award. Our Research Center on Computing and Society, founded and led by Terrell Ward Bynum, has explored the ethics of computer science and technology since 1988. Dr Heidi Lockwood, Professor of Philosophy, will join the project. Dr. Lisa Lancor, Professor and Chair of the Computer Science Department will serve as Principal Investigator on the Project. Dr. Greg McVerry, Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Learning, and long-time Mozilla contributor, will lead our efforts to facilitate the development of course curricula  that align our long history of exploring ethics and computer science with theories of open pedagogy.

Theoretical Principles

We draw on John Dewey and see digital literacies and ethics in computer science as necessary for efforts in democratic education. The pedagogy used will center around production-based inquiry methods. We will also encourage all participants to reflect openly on a blogging platform. We will encourage further involvement of the larger Mozilla WebVR community in the project

Why WebVR

We believe webVR has the greatest reach and impact when teaching ethics. While the cost of full virtual reality rigs and the computer to power these systems are out of reach for most of the global population, WebVR is accessible to anyone with a phone and Mozilla’s virtual reality web browser.

Open Pedagogy

Every participant will have their own website domain and a  content management system. Our theoretical underpinning is that agency and belief in oneself as a writer is essential in order to engage in the reflective thought required in ethics education. In today’s networked society (Castells & Cardozza, 2006), a new set of skills and practices have emerged, and we must design for diversity and inclusivity by acknowledging computer science has not been a safe space (boyd, 2018) (1,137 characters)

Formative Design

Collect Baseline Data

We will begin with focus group interviews with students who have completed CSC 235 Web and Database Development and ask about how they felt the class integrated lessons of technology and allowed them to develop their own space online. This class will include introductions to building A-Frame as students learn HTML.

We will also collect efficacy data about how participants feel towards storytelling. They will be asked to choose a picutre from a set and explain how the picture represents how they feel about their skill level. 

Develop Learning Interventions

We will then create and file the necessary paperwork for our new and revised courses. These courses will be designed in conjunction with our students and assigned a license that allows for . We will work with Mozillians already creating content on Glitch to develop WebVR tutorials.

Implement Interventions

We will then implement the courses and collect student feedback. The class will be open to SCSU for credit but open to global participants to play and contribute. Data will be triangulated using their blog posts and plus delta charts at multiple time points.

Analyze Data

After the first run of classes we will analyze the data to determine which factors inhibited and which factors supported our pedagogical goals.

Iterate on Learning Interventions

We will then revise the coursework and run the classes again.

Analyze Data

Finally, we will analyze  data one last time using content analysis to identify themes that brought us closer to our pedagogical goals.

 

 

 

Working Open:

 

We will open this project to the wider computer science and WebVR world. In fact, as we write this proposal, we welcome Pull Requests and issues at GitHub

Open Begins on Your Own Domain

As we develop this project, all participants will be encouraged to blog and share their reflections and learnings.  We believe working open involves not only "documenting and sharing your concept with broader audiences",  but inviting  audiences to get involved and help shape both the project and our openly networked space for learning.

To this end, all participants from the PI to each student will be given a url and a blog. We will use a social reader and technologies called to connect learners.

Open Pedagogy

The two courses designed for this class will carry an open license. In fact, they will be built using readily available tools. Members of Mozilla's WebVR community have already expressed interest in both designing and taking the course.

Open Data and Privacy

No participant will be required to share openly and will have full control to license their own content as long as they meet the requirements of any reused code or previously licensed content.( 

 

 

 

Internet Health:

 

In a recent survey on Internet Health, specifically the future of connected devices, Mozilla found that those who identify as ultra nerds are more optimistic about the web than those not always online. This result mirror's danah boyd's twentieth anniversary critique of John Berry Barlow's original manifesto. Ultra-nerds come from a place of privilege, and this usually means white, male, and from the global north. We never designed the web for diversity because the original designers had never felt threatened, were never stalked. This explains why, even today, Amnesty International find female journalists get attacked every ten seconds online

In college I did have a stalker. It was a very scary experience. I come to technology with a different perspective because of that experience. It is not a matter of techno panic but a matter of self-preservation....lots of people in Silicon Valley who have never had a Stalker. They are not thinking like that. If you get more people involved that have had …well…Diversity improves technology in a way that makes regulation less necessary Stacey Higginbotham, This Week in Google.

We seek to improve internet health by ensuring that ethics, especially the areas of diversity and inclusion, gets taught as a principle of first design. WebVR provides a useful avenue for this approach as we can put hypothetical characters in situations that would not be ethical to do to real humans. Furthermore, early research into counseling, PTSD, and autism finds virtual reality may help to improve empathy.

We will utilize a series of case studies as models and encourage students to record and create A-Frame content. The use of a WebVR first approach also allows us to reach a much larger audience with our message of ethics in computer science. While the price point on high end virtual reality rig  the cost makes it inaccessible to almost 100% of the world population. Anyone with a smartphone and a compatible lens can use WebVR.

Our MVP case studies we propose and will develop with our students include:

  • Greening the Web: Do you really need React or Blockchain when HTML will do?
  • Code of Conduct: Better conferences or Kangaroo Court?
  • False Positives: Do Algorithms protect us?
  • HTML First: A Matter of ?

Our students will then work in distributed teams with open participants across the web to create additional case studies.

 

 

 

 

A scan of scholarly articles and a survey of virtual reality and computer science specialists found no evidence of anyone else trying to teach ethics through the use of WebVR. We posted messages to GitHub repos, Telegram, Twitter, and Slack in communities that focus on webVR.

While we did not find anyone currently doing similar work, we did find a large expressed interest from people who want to contribute. In fact, we are already collaborating with the two most popular A-Frame  teachers in the greater Mozilla networks.

However recent outreach on Twitter https://twitter.com/jgmac1106/status/1088453939861712897 lead to emergin connections to other researchers in the State of Connecticut may lead to partnerships on scale up efforts. 

 

 

 

 

Key Personnel

Dr. Lisa Lancor (an 8.3% effort, or 1.0)will enable her to oversee course development and program instruction as well as administration of the project funds. Dr. Lancor will also revise courses following their operation and analyze data collected.

Co-PI Greg McVerry (a 9.4% effort, or 1.13 Academic Months). He  will act as a pedagogy and instructional design expert helping to design courses. Dr. McVerry will also coordinate with third party developers creating learning tools. He will also devote 0.5 Summer Months above and beyond his normal duties to the project, for an additional 4.2% effort

Additional salary support for Co-PI Heidi Lockwood (a 2.7% effort, or 0.3 Summer Month) 4% of time will provide assistance in applying the philosophy of ethics to our course design.

Other Personnel

Student 1 $15 per hour for 20 hr/wk. This student will help to record and edit instructional videos, data collection, provide four hours of open online office hours for help, and spend four hours documenting the program through our website and social media.

Student 2 will be paid $12 per hour for 10 hr/wk  He or she will handle  office logistics and filing of university required paperwork. They will provide technical assistance in the lab during class time. 

Fringe Benefits

Fringe benefits for are protected under the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Dr. Lancor  64.70% rate on summer work; Dr. McVerry 83.47% rate on course release and 49.72% rate on summer; Dr. Lockwood  72.73% on summer work. Students do not receive fringe during the academic year.

Materials and Supplies

Insta360 Pro II Spherical VR 360 8K Camera, Extra Battery & Charger Kit, $6,000

 Audio recording equipment $4,000

3 Garmin VIRB 360 Action Camera $2,100

Audio remixing and studio equipment, $2,900

5 high-end desktops or laptops $20,0000

Other

  • Professional Installation, 2000 for the set-up of the audio recording studio
  • Developer, Malcom Blaney, [FJ1]  at $75 for 65 hours.; Create a ledger and micropub client for issuing and recording webmention badges. and HTML.
  • Developer, Grant Richardson, $9,000 at $75 for 120 hours; Create a lightweight blogging CMS using nodejs. Include webmentions, indieauth, and micropub endpoints. Create a microformats parser for tracking class participation. 

Indirect Costs: SCSU maintains a negotiated indirect cost agreement with DHHS. Copies of SCSU’s NICRA are available upon request.

 

 

Risks:

 

As a university sponsored project, all research activity funded by this grant will require approval from the SCSU  Institutional Review Board and any consent and assent from participants.

Humane Tech isn't Engineered

Mindsets do not shift easily. Many developers look to engineer their way to the perfect social solution. This world belief that "Code can save the world, but only I can write it" traces its roots, as Sara Wachter-Boettcher (2017) points out, back to bias engineered into computer science since the 1950's when  identified loner men as the most apt for programming and then built assessments to identify these types of employees. Yet  of bias of perfection, impostor syndrome to explicit bias around competition, verbal discourse, and neurodiversity have weeded their way through all of our history (Banaji & Greenwald, 2017).

We cannot code our way to better community. While what we engineer reflects our bias, engineering alone can never overcome perspectives and pasts. Instead we must carve anew; placing our principles before our pull  requests. To overcome the risk of settled mindsets we will first put a focus on listening to voices who tech does not serve or has not served safely.

We will then root the story of ethics in Computer Science into the narratives of at-risk populations. We will study the shape of the story and come to understand how the prescriptive technologies (Ursula, 2004) control the shape of stories we tell. We will then create narratives through the webVR case studies.

This does introduce the risk of too many possibilities. Amy Burvall notes that constraints lead to greater creativity. We will mitigate this risk by first focusing on creating webVR using A-Frame technologies as a proof of concept before scaling up to a full virtual reality recording studio.

However, we will provide everyone with a Domain  of their own and a blog to ensure they own their stories.

Interdisciplinary Approach

Our use of webVR and A-Frame will require computer science engineers to study digital storytelling and narratology while English and education majors study computer science. The populations served by many community colleges and state universities in the United States have multiple jobs and families to raise. Adding additional domains of knowledge to already crowded curriculum can add stress to the lives of students.

To mitigate these risks, we will add additional scaffolds, a network of open participants, bi-monthly face to face meetings, and on-demand video tutorials.  We will also stress importance of community in Open Pedagogy and encourage participants to rely on each other and the knowledge we create and curate together.

Open and Privacy

Online communication, such as tweets, blog posts, and comments are generally out in the open and technically “public” and available for researchers to analyze and quote. Internet researchers have, however, documented how a particular communication may be technically public but viewed by the individual who posted it as meant for a more limited or private context.

Even if an individual feels that they have “published” in public or have consented to be part of research, they might still feel like trust has been violated if their words are taken up and re-framed in a way that they feel is out of context or misrepresented. While this study will seek IRB approval, we also have stringent rules around users:

·       We will analyze and publish data that is de-identified or aggregated in ways that cannot be traced back to an individual.

  • Any identifiable quotes or descriptions of activities will not be used in a research publication or presentation without the permission of the individual. This includes anonymized or pseudonymized quotes, because they can be linked back through a search engine to an individual public posting.

Participants may also be contacted and recruited to participate in surveys and interviews for specific research studies. In these cases, we will offer a clear explanation of the consent and privacy procedures, how the data will be used, and what benefit the research will provide to the individual and the community. We will also allow interviewees the opportunity to review transcripts and quotes.

No student will be required to join the study. In fact, someone beside the class instructor will collect permissions and the teaching professor will not know who agreed to be included until grades are submitted.  Participants may be asked to complete an additional consent form that will be reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board..

 

 

Student Audience:

 

At Southern Connecticut State University, we design for a future where there is no separate tech industry, for we embrace the truth of the present that every industry is now a tech industry. Therefore, our entry level class in the program will be offered to all students as part of our Liberal Education Program. This class will focus on the structure of storytelling, character development, and storytelling.

We will fork and also participate in the online class . This distributed learning community is the longest continuously running MOOC  and will connect our Southern students to open web advocates from across the globe. These students will be invited to join our efforts at developing ethical case studies using traditional new media.

All of our Computer Science undergraduate and graduate students take a class in computer ethics. All the case studies developed as part of this grant will be deployed in this class to be used by all of our computer science classes.

We will also revise our graduate level ethical hacking class to include case studies specifically around the ethics of privacy and security. Every computer science graduate class offers this program.

We will also develop and propose a new class on learning A-Frame and WebVR. While students will not complete case studies in this class, they will take storyboards and scripts students wrote in DS106, apply greater disciplinary and tier-three academic language, then develop the webVR files using the editing studio funded by this grant.

 

All the material we create from this class, including participant blogs, will be made openly available on the Glitch platform and GitHub. We have already started to work with collaborators who have created A-Frame tutorials and host these files on Glitch as well. Participants will maintain the right to license their content  however they choose.

This strategy of providing locally curated content that we also open to the web at large will lead to the greatest number of students to be involved in the grant. Working openly also provides a greater voice for our students to get involved in the design of the classes and the projects. The SCSU computer science club has expressed an interest and reported to the department they would like instruction in virtual reality. Any student member can join the steering committee simply by showing up to a meeting or filing a pull request on the team repo.

We also hope computer science, philosophy, business or education schools take up and use the case studies developed by our students. While we believe the learning and knowledge students gain by creating, editing and animating their videos will lead to greater knowledge growth, we will also develop the curriculum for programs that would just like to utilize our series of case studies.

The tutorials on A-Frame and WebVR that we will develop in conjunction with the Mozilla Virtual Reality community will also reach thousands. Having  tutorials framed around e ethics will further reinforce the concept that diversity and inclusion need to be a first design principle.

While traditional instructional design places a priority on learning objectives, ethics in computer science can never work this way. Inclusion should never be a rubric. No one should get a “2.7 proficient in diversity” score. Creating a culture of ethics as a first principle of design requires us to reshape society and not learners.

As Gary Stager points out (2005 pg 3), a focus on instructionalism, the measurable objective, direct instruction, forced response assessment, in education using the web leads to "delivering re-purposed content to students via the Internet. Communication, collaboration, community and construction are afterthoughts graded onto modern correspondence courses."

This data fetishization is a symptom of society rooted in the same problem that lead to the lack of ethics in computer science. Being inclusive doesn't exist on a Likert scale; it develops on a human scale

Therefore, rather than specific learner objectives, we will work with participants to set their "subjectives" (Cormier, 2015) and let them determine the goals in a class that is

·       Collaborative – everyone, including the instructor, learns together and takes responsibility for everyone else’s learning.

·       Documented - the processes of learning are more important that the specifics of the knowledge constructed. The learning process, therefore, is documented in the...

·       Open - by exposing learning to colleagues and the public, students take the first steps in taking control of their digital identity and expanding their horizons as connected learners-John Becker, 2016.

Community we create will teach more about ethics than specific content. By utilizing case studies, we can connect with multiple perspectives and allow for growth and self-remediation yet we must live these lessons to the spaces and tools we build.

 

 

Measuring Success:

 

Measuring Success

Space as Variable of Interest

As our focus is more on measuring success in our spaces of learning, we will ask learners to plot how they feel the class supports learners in growing on the following scales:

  • Lead
    • Learn
    • Teach
    • Innovate
    • Evangelize
    • Organize
  • Communicate
    • Inquiry
    • Identify
    • Position
    • Empathize
    • Engage
  • Think
    • Question
    • Reflect
    • Analyze
    • Decide
    • Change
  • Create
    • Build
    • Test
    • Iterate
    • Differentiate
    • Scale

 

We will  will create a simple web app for participants to record not where they feel the majority of students engage with the participatory learning environments. After each class students, will simply click on across each of the four scales. We will use this data to iterate on how we meet our pedagogical goals.

Curating Evidence of Success

Each week all participants will be asked to select a picture and write a brief not explaining how the picture captures how they feel. Using content analysis and semiotic analysis we will explore the visual metaphors participants choose. This will provide evidence of knowledge growth from participants. This task is also designed to reinforce visual thinking in the creation of case studies.

Parsing for Growth

Because A-Frame is written in declarative HTML, we will be able to track knowledge growth by using HTML parsers and a type of metadata called microformats. These will be included in both the case study templates, student blogs, and the A-Frame starter kits.

We will also be able to track the number of changes students make using the history available to us in both Git and Glitch.

Webmention badges

We will also create a platform to issue badges. These have been piloted and successfully deployed. All class instructional pages will accept webmentions. Students will apply for a badge by writing a post in reply to the course explaining how they met criteria. If they met the criteria a webmention badge will be sent in reply to the application and to the student’s badge display page.

Circuit of Reflective Inquiry

Ethics requires a study of self and society through a process of self-remediation and democratic education. As we try to measure success of these efforts in Computer Science, we attempt to use multiple pieces of evidence that still put agency in the learner to focus on their subjectives. In this approach we hope to measure growth through Gee's circuit of reflective action:

We formulate a goal (and the goal could be answering a question) and then we take an action in the world. We see how the world responds to the action, ask ourselves whether this response was good or not for the accomplishment of our goal, and then, if need be, act again on better information or a redefined goal. The circuit of reflective action is an interactive conversation with the world.

Greg McVerry

4 Reasons @GetClassicPress Should Add Native Microformats Support

4 min read

Now that phase one of Gutenberg has dropped the interest in grows by the day. So many WordPress developers fear the loss of control they will face under the new regime of 5.0. Many just don't want to do the work of all that refactoring.

and should join forces.

wonder twin powers activate

The WordPress community has discussed the inclusion of microformats into ClassicPress core. I wanted to share our thinking

1. The Philosophical Right Choice

So many altruistic efforts fail under the premise of building platforms, data, and systems free of bias. They will all fail. Technology can never be free of bias. When you choose a stack, a language, or metadata you make a philosophical and political choice.

Microformats make sense for the web and for ClassicPress. A few properties in your HTML and you are  done. More importantly keeping the web in semantic HTML helps to ensure it stays open in the future.

One plain text file and you can be online. Let's not lose that. Sustainability, energy consumption, the web affects it all. Microformats gives us the ability to keep websites light weight while providing the plumbing for some really cool things.

Choosing to exclude, or to rely on JSON-LD alone, is also a choice. When people say, "That is what Google and Yoast want..." Ask yourself,  "Do you want to design ClassicPress for your goals or Google's?"

"Do you want good content or some companies SEO tricks to drive discovery?"

It is always a philosophical choice. How will you choose?

Morgan

2. Empower the Web as THE Social Network

Scroll through the history of blogging research. Up until 2004 the research framed the blogger, the learner, and  the networks being sources of agency and power. Then from that time on the research became about SEO and dominating places others owned.

Is the web you want to build with ClassicPress? The project will fail if the old value proposition of syndication and exposure are used. 

ClassicPress needs a better social web to survive. 

Have you tried webmentions yet? No this W3C approved standard brings social to your website as you publish a  reply on your website  to a post from a friend and your reply shows up on their site as a comment. Microformats make webmentions useful. and possible.

What social reader will ClassicPress use? It won't be WordPress or anything connected to JetPack. Microformats empowers a new generation, using webmentions, and some other open protocols micropub (writing API) and microsub (reading API) to create a way to

Adding native microformats support will provide ClassicPress with an abundance of already built community tools. Don't repeat our mistakes or waste limited open source resources.

Use what people already built.

trippy dots floating in air

3. Committed Community to help ClassicPress

We have come to love the IndieWeb's focus on personal goals to sustain open source communities (everyone uses open APIs and majority open source their work). Building for yourself does help to sustain when your values align with others in your network. No white papers, no committees, just  code. 

We want the same for ClassicPress.

Having members loosely organized but bound by a sense of duty to the web  works and our community wants to build the future with ClassicPress.  We have an install base in the thousands with hundreds of active members using IndieWeb WordPress every day. The WordPress IRC/Slack channel never stops.

ClassicPress may see a huge influx of users, much larger than your targeted business audience, when the second phase of Gutnberg drops and theme developers and users need to decide to update or move on.

Many will move on. We need to get ready. Let's work together. 

All we need to make it happen is native microformats2 support.

turtles flipping each other over

4. Compatible with other Metadata 

No one is asking ClassicPress not to use JSON-LD, a commitment to open standards and APIs all we need. In fact SemPress, the most widely used IndieWeb theme, already includes support for mf2 and JSON-LD.

We just need to add a few properties to rendered HTML...and whizbang...it just works.

we are so compatible

Greg McVerry

Agency and the Act of Blogging #mb

2 min read

@Tonz and @kevinmarks have been my connections on earlier blogging research. One thing that struck me was the demise of research at BlogCon.

While the file formats stink I can find much of the conference research up to 2004...Then when the conference remerged in 2006 it was about SEO and building reach.

What happened? We went from building networks to trying to dominate someone else's platform. 

A loss of agency as the world migrated away from the holistic world of blogging to the prescriptive world of social media.

The research agenda shifted from agency to being an ad agency.

Teachers Keep Flame Burning

Meanwhile across the USA teachers wanted to bring the power of social media to the classroom. Yet due to the dangers of social media, plus some technopanic, we kept students in even stricter silos.

Yet often time this was blogging. 

Many of us also adopted production based pedagogies for writing that embraced agentive writing. 

Blogs were built for this. Many of us just lost the way as we got distracted by shiny new objects...and the social media did reduce barriers of access to what was, and still is in many ways,  a majority white male world online. 

Hard to Hold a Candle Against a Firehose

As the world went all in on social media teachers from kindergarten to college kept the blogosphere alive. Blogger, Edublogs, SeeSaw, School website CMSs. In almost every district everywhere there was a minimum of one teacher blogging with students the last ten years.

That's a ton of people, many now reaching young adult age, who hunger for more agency online.

We could never keep the fire burning one at a time, but if we all stick together maybe the fire can burn bright enough. 

Greg McVerry

Notes For: The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning

17 min read

Orwell

Note:

Being smart, especially in a fast-changing and complex world, requires people to beg, borrow, or steal new ideas.

Note:

initial mentorship to get us prepared to learn from experience in specific areas or domains; lots of prior experience; clear goals; something being “at stake” (mattering to us emotionally); and the opportunity to act in a way that elicits a meaningful response from the world.

 

Note:Circuit of reflective action

idiots savants

Note:

 

What does this truth-seeking game look like? It looks a lot like what we called in the first chapter the “circuit of reflective action” carried out collaboratively. In the circuit of reflective action, we formulate a goal (and the goal could be answering a question) and then we take an action in the world. We see how the world responds to the action, ask ourselves whether this response was good or not for the accomplishment of our goal, and then, if need be, act again on better information or a redefined goal. The circuit of reflective action is an interactive conversation with the world.

 

Note:Gee on the collaborative nature of truth seeking

This leaves us in this chapter with the human need for agency. By this I mean that people want to feel they are effective actors in the world, not just spectators of other people’s actions. They want to feel that their actions have their intended consequences and will lead to success in accomplishing their goals (this is a large part of what feeling a sense of control is about).

 

Note:Gee defining agency Also implications to why is starting place.

 

To be agents, people need both opportunities to be an agent and models of effective action. They need to see that taking action can really matter, and they need to see what successful action looks like.

 

Note:Gee on why agency matters.

Such self-organizing knowledge communities also freeze thought. They have their own standards and conventional ways of proceeding, often built bottom up and democratically to some extent. But they seem to be able to unfreeze decisions and solutions faster than formal institutions can.

 

Note:Gee on knowledge communities being able to unfreeze institutional thought.

(extended) kin, they could see what others saw as corruption in different terms. The deathbed scene in Edwin

Note:

Let’s use the term “imagined kin group

 

Note:A phrase loaded with connotative meaning.

 

What polarizes a group and makes its members reject multiple perspectives and critique? One thing that can do it is a feeling of being oppressed or not appreciated, of being “cheated” of their rightful due.

 

Note:Want an example? Read the comments at @politico

 

Unions became, for some, kin-like groups.

 

Note:unions defined as kin-like and not imagined kin groups. Take opportunities to discuss bias.

 

 

We can all be in “Schools for One.” However, we have argued throughout this book that one can be a lonely and stupid number for us humans when we are left alone to “be me” and “do it my way.

 

Note:Interesting thesis on the problems of overly customized learning.

 

The genius of human beings was and is the invention and use of tools to make themselves smarter.

 

Note:JPG defining human intelligence based on tools.

There is a name for the ways in which knowledge and ability can be shared between a human mind and a tool. It is called “distributed cognition.” The ability to see far is distributed (shared) between the eye and the telescope;

 

Note:If knowledge exists between human and tool where does intelligence lie? The act or mind?

 

An artificial tutor learns how a learner behaves and what the learner likes and then adapts to the learner, which is a form of leading the learner to water and persuading him to drink

 

Note:Defining artificial tutors.

This had one good effect and one bad one. The good effect was that more people could design and unleash their own creativity. The bad effect was that people needed to learn less and work less hard. It was harder, too, to earn status, since more people could now design well without a lot of learning and hard work.

 

Note:On plusses and minuses of intuitive design features and updates. Status and access affected.

Experts are people certified by other experts who know a great deal about one relatively narrow area. The disciplinary names we use, labels like “economics,” “biology,” and “law”—are actually too broad to characterize an expert. Experts specialize in sub-parts of these larger domains.

 

Note:Defining experts. Status and competency based?

 

Options

Understanding and dealing with the consequences of complex systems requires pooling different types of expertise from different domains in a highly collaborative way. Going it alone is out of date and dangerous.

 

Note:Why we need collaborative models of teaching and learning.

 

Options

two basic foundations for why the human mind can so easily go awry in the modern world. One is that humans are not oriented toward truth but to meaning. The second is that humans do not like to carry heavy things around in their minds.

 

Note:Notice the explicit cues to text structure in the chapter. Gee tells us his organization.

Humans orient toward meaning in the sense that a person, thing, or event has significance and value within a story that gives their life and actions, and the world they live in, a purpose. For humans, meaning in this sense answers questions like “Who am I?,” “Why am I here?,” and “How am I part of something larger than myself?

 

Note:Gee takes a practical view of "meaning" and describes importance of the narrative.

The human urge to find and create meaning is closely related to what we called in an earlier chapter mental comfort stories.

 

Note:Looking for meaning to explain. Hope is a veil draped over natures indiscriminate ways.

 

Perhaps ironically, we humans have never become modern mentally. Most of us still do not like to carry in our heads knowledge that does not seem applicable or useful in the near future.

 

Note:Pracitical knowledge dominates our daily thoughts.

 

Nothing weighs heavier on the human mind than complexity. We humans are very poor at dealing with it. Too bad, then, that the modern world is replete with high-risk complex systems

 

Note:Interesting point but also notice the transition to the next chapter.

In complex systems there are too many variables and too many interactions among them to control them all. Thus, they are not directly open to being studied through “controlled studies” of the sort normal in less complex areas of science.

 

Note:Education and the classroom are def. complex systems.

 

I mean by this questions that can only be answered by considering and at least partially figuring out the workings of a complex system or a system complex enough to count as a complex system to our human understanding

Note:

difference w/ cognitive science. It's transformational knowledge not transfer of knowledge.

Such questions require pooling lots of different sources of knowledge, building models, trying and re-trying different interventions, testing various explanations, and returning again and again to the drawing board. They require looking at things from different perspectives and seeking alternative viewpoints and new sources of ideas.

 

Note:Better definitions of inquiry learning. We need to encourage transformational knowledge.

 

We know this though: complexity and our inability as societies to deal with it is killing us. Global warming, environmental degradation, global flows of economic speculation and risk taking, overpopulation, global debt, new viruses, terrorism and warfare, and political polarization are killing us. Dealing with big questions takes a long-term view, cooperation, delayed gratification, and deep learning that crosses traditional silos of knowledge production.

 

Note:Collaborative Inquiry. The reason it's cornerstone of online research and media skills.

Our public sphere is in tatters. We are divided by ideology and harmed by greed. More and more in our highly competitive societies, it is each of us for ourselves or our families alone.

 

Note:I really see this starting with the birth of the internet, conservative radio, and The Clinton Era.

But looked at as part of an ant colony, the ant is very impressive indeed. What if humans are missing their colony? What would their colony be?

 

Note:We romanticize social insects quite often. They deserve awe but the metaphor ain't perfect.

public forum.

 

Note:In many ways the true public forum is a dream as old as democracy.

 

 

it means that status affects everyone’s health all the way along the line of the status hierarchy. Lower status = less health; higher status = more health all the way along the line as a matter of statistical probability.

 

Note:Why we must recognize the Literacies involved in the spaces kids play hack and make in.

They also feel a sense of agency and control when they feel that their actions count and contribute to society, when they feel like participants and not spectators.

 

Note:This is also true in the classroom.

chapter that these needs are integral to human beings. When

Note:

 

is our appreciative system in different domains that tells us whether the results of our actions—our probes into the world—are good or bad for accomplishing our goals. We

 

Note:Interesting concept here. Will have to think on this one.

empirical question does not ever lead to absolute truth. The “game” of answering empirical questions is a “pragmatic” game. We seek the best answers we can, act on them as our “best bets,” and stay open to revising them and learning more.

 

Note:The "game" of answering empirical inquiry questions.

 

Science is the empirical game and we have seen that the empirical game is just the normal circuit of reflective action on steroids.

 

Note:Definition of science.

 

rare piece of information or a rare viewpoint may be crazy and, if so, it will wash out as we pool all our sources.

 

Note:The internet is a self gleaning oven of ideas.

 

Options

 

 

empirical game, whether played by credentialed scientists or by all of us, must always and everywhere be coupled with social activism with the goal of making a better world where more people count

 

Note:Social activism as being central to scientific inquiry?

 

 

Options

engaged in social activism,

 

Note:And those who engage in clicktivism. "Ohh you changed your Facebook profile pic. Big deal" edu523

 

Options

humans as reciprocal tools for each other + nonhuman tools (artifacts and technologies) all networked and integrated together. We are “plug-and-play entities,

 

Note:Knowledge and memory then would be situated in activity and embodied acts.

 

Options

network a “Mind” with a capital “M.” A Mind

 

Note:Gee loves distinguishing by playing with letter conventions.

 

Options

Which people and what tools I plug into and play with are those I hope and believe will make my life and my world meaningful and valuable.

 

Note:Purpose driving education.

 Mind Visions are ideas about what groups and whole societies, coupled with their tools, ought to do. They can be visions of the good life, of morality, or of power and destiny. They can lead to great good or great ill. Mind Visions do not really come from any one person. They have to be ideas that are contagious and that spread.

 

Note:Collective thought or visions. How borgish yet compelling.

Synchronized intelligence is a well-coordinated dance among humans and tools in the service of a better world. It is the intelligence of people linked to each other and to good tools, not left on their own. Synchronized intelligence is the product of Minds working well.

 

Note:Synchronized intelligence. wonder if Agee distinguishes between intelligence and knowledge.

 

 

affinity spaces should have the following features.

 

Note:Great looks like a more exhaustive list. Time to redo the video.

 

 

People are in them by choice. They are in the space because of a shared interest in a common endeavor, not because of their race, class, or gender. Their affinity for each other is based on a shared endeavor. In fact, on the Internet people can hide their race, class, and gender (and other aspects of their identity) and use these as assets strategically if, when, and where they want to. In an affinity space people choose who they will be and which parts of themselves they will invest and share. People of diverse ages and backgrounds are in the affinity space. They are not age-graded. People with different skills and different levels of expertise are in the affinity space. People range from “newbies” to “old hands.” In some affinity spaces credentialed experts comport with amateurs. Sometimes amateurs get to be as expert as credentialed experts, becoming “pro-ams” (professional amateurs). Some people in the space have an interest in the common endeavor and some have a real passion for it. The space is built to fan interest into passion. However, one need not go all the way to passion— people can satisfy their interest and move on—but they must respect the passion as an attractor to the space. Those with passion set high standards that others acknowledge and seek to emulate. There is no “grade inflation” or “dumbing down,” only multiple routes to mastery for those who seek it. This does not mean standards are not negotiated and contestable, but it does mean that people in the site have allegiance to discussing and pursuing excellence. The space is focused on knowing and doing (production, solving problems), not just on knowing. Some people make massive numbers of contributions to the space, others make many less, but every contribution, large or small, has the chance to matter, change things, and contribute. The space recruits a diverse array of talents. Even someone with limited skills or quite rare or special skills can find a place where their contribution counts. The space is designed to allow for multiple contributions, to leverage diversity so that no piece of knowledge or skill goes untapped, and, yet, too, to focus people’s attention on the places, problems, and parts of problems to which they can make their best contributions. Yet people are still allowed to roam free if they want to and try new things. In an affinity space, leadership and status are flexible. People sometimes lead and

 

Note:I notice in the new list of defining features Gee omits the word knowledge. I wonder??

what I will call “storied truths.

 

Note:In all of Gee's writing storytelling , writing, making is central to learning.

 

 

Research has shown that brainstorming, in which students throw out as many ideas as they can with no critique—supposedly to free them up from fear of criticism—can easily make students less creative than they would have been if left on their own. Teams, whether students or not, actually perform better when the free flow of ideas is coupled with critique and debate.

 

Note:Need to find the research on brainstorming.

 

Rather, human intelligence and creativity, today more than ever, are tied to connecting—synchronizing—people, tools, texts, digital and social media, virtual spaces, and real spaces in the right ways, in ways that make us Minds and not just minds, but also better people in a better world.

 

Note:Intelligence as syncing

 

All these programs would share data (something that digital media can help with) in order to support children’s learning in a coordinated way.

 

Note:Lot of fear of big Data among parents.

Greg McVerry

Excited for #HipHopEd Tonight

3 min read

Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BKBr_DiD79l/

I am looking forward to lurking on tonight. I learn a lot on this chat as I listen. I am drawn to spaces of literacy scholars where words and meaning are seen first as tools of both agency and oppression. Tonight I will be looking forward to curating inspirational quotes.

Our GearUp work with students of color often revolve around the teaching and learning of digital literacies and pedagogies. We have created digital art, written letters to the next president, examined website credibility and created memes.

It is this last element that has me most interested in today's chat. I use memes as a method to include the basics of HTML. It is a the language of HTML using the discourses of youth. Fun stuff. I encourage everyone tonight to try one.

There is so much talk about the diversity problem in tech. This is not just an industry problem or a pipeline problem. It is a societal problem. We are creating a new era of digital imperialism. The segregation of our digital spaces is often much stronger than the analog world.

There are issues of access. Technology simply does not exist in many our poorest communities. Families are often on shifting data plans and pushing up aganist their limit. Mobile first can not be the only solution. In the suburbs big chains offer free wifi. The same chains like McDonalds and Dunkin Donuts post no loitering signs.

There are issues of equity. Based on recent PEW reports students of color have more screen time than their white peers. Yet the quality of the screen and the activity differs greatly. Yet no where are are computers used more for non-creative activity such as testing and remediation than our schools. I have bumped up against this myself when pushing for greater web literacy in schools. Its ths common reframe, "but have you seen there reing scores? I can't spend time on tech."

Newsflash. Tech is how we read and write. It is literacy. No where is this demonstrated more than in places like . Scholars, musicians, activists and artists gather around a cause and use our words to make the world a better place.

So make a meme tonight with an inspirational quote. Then encourage someone else to do the same. Lift the curtain to how tech and code work.

CLMOOC

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