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My quick thoughts, back stage, and rants as I try to Teach kids about the Web while learning how to help others build a better Web.

IndieWebRing

Come Journey Through the IndieWeb Sites

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Greg McVerry

Carving out Room For Subjectives in New Educational Spaces #edu522

My Who Am I Post

3 min read

In every conversation you hear calls to get back to school, to "Get back to Normal."

I don't like the old normal. Normal did not work for the majority of our children. Especially black, brown, and indigenous kids.

I want to serve up something new.

So to illustrate my subjectives for this class I decided to learn a bit more whittling and carve up a spoon.

wooden sppon unfisinished

I believe we must mix up perspectives and I am hoping to accomplish two projects in this class:

  • A digital handbook on how to blog using WordPress and the SemPress theme
  • An autoethnography on me learning to build a poetry page as I taught a LEP Tech class and participated in the IndieWeb movement

Eat Your Own Cooking

As I try to stir up good trouble in my career I use a lens of digitally engaged scholarship. Borrowing from community engage scholarship I can not separate my creative activity, teaching, and service. These three, I believe, need to work together in service to the greater good in partnership with communities and learners

For the last few years much of these efforts for me have revolved around the IndieWeb movement. I help an amazing group of web activists. We started the Elm City Webmakers, run a free tech camp for teens in New Haven, and organize events all over the world. Developers release amazing technology that re-envisions the web as our social network.

Recently the IndieWeb community, in continuous reflections on diversity and inclusiuon metaphors, adopted a metaphor of "eat your own cooklng" to replace the metaphor of "self dog-fooding." This just means using the stuff you build and building stuff to use rather than just talking about building.

So I thought the spoon made a good physical metaphor for my subjectives. I always thought of my pocket knife as my original 3-d printer. It just works backwards much like an autoethnography. I also want to stir up good trouble to start recentering the web in marginalized communities.

Cook With Others

Recently at the IndieWeb West conference I facilitated a session on Cooking For Others. I am glad we moved on from the idea of self-dogfooding, but I wanted to try and get at something else. It's hard for me to describe, still working out the idea but for many they come to movements and communities, out of a sense of duty to others.

The idea of only using what you build made Silicon Valley billionaires. The model works. I just wonder if it works for everyone. Maybe it is a bit of mindset and not just metaphors we need to shift.

At the same time I will never ask my students to do something I will not do. So I am asking you to learn something new and be open about the process. Therefore I needed to the same.

I guess me learnining how to whittle is my attempt. I carved a missing chess pawn when we went camping with neighbors and I recently found myself desperate for an evening distraction. I work around the clock M-R and my partner works at a restautant W-S.

Basically stare at a screen all day. Have binged everything bingebale on all the networks (well still need to finsih the 100) and haven't done any kidless adulting, or any social gatherings since March.

Why not just stare at a fire and whittle wood? Sharing my carving will be the dish I bring to our table. I can not wait to see what tales you serve up.

Greg McVerry

What exactly is #indieweb and how can we talk about it?

Across the numerous indieweb channels people have started to talk about how to discuss indieweb as the community and tools evolve into versions 2, 3,

4 min read

Across the numerous indieweb channels people have started to talk about how to discuss indieweb as the community and tools evolve into versions 2, 3, 4. Folks refer to these more as generations rather than traditional version conventions used in software development.

The basic gist of the problem to me boiled down to mission, audience, and purpose.

First and foremost the community is guided by a  set of principles. You can read those here.  Not suprisingly  these principles jhave much in common with open source communities like Mozilla and our manifestoDrupal and Wordpress community leaders and members share much of this ethos. Domain's of Own's Own is basically the in education circles.

Is the community different? Same? Both?

While I got some pushback I noted that the what makes the different is the adherence to specific protocolos to  support the Publish on Your Own Site and Syndicate Elsewhere (POSSE) philosophy.

It is that philosophy that I can introduce to new users. That's my elevator pitch.

The implementation of POSSE  usually involves some combination of MicroPub,an API standard; Microsub, a newer standard that manages subscriptions; Microformats, an html extension that allow sitse to publish a standard API other sites can consume; and webmentions, which is a standard that allows you to track mentions of a link across the web.

While none or all of these tools are required to make a site "indieweb" having a focus on human readable (versus machine readable stuff that focuses JSON-LD for example) mark-ups and semantics is a major focus of . It is a pluralistic user-centric approach to the web.

Putting the users in control of their data, on their own site, and connecting to others through open standards and inter-operability. Sounds like a web I want.

As stated, and most did not agree with me, that the community is very united behind these APIs, standards, and mark-up techniques. In fact it is this loyalty that makes the community different than other "open web" communitities.

The problem moving forward: communicating this to non-technical readers. I mean, I barely understand the last few paragraphs I wrote.

Describing

As Eddie noted the challenge we were discussing was,  "trying to figure out a way to explain if a Micropub/Microsub client can work with a given service without using protocol names that can be confused for Gen 3/4 users"

Here were some ideas I had. These are just mine and do not reflect the opinions of others:

  • For individual blogs I suggested a badge (one exists) that people can add to their blogs after running their site through a validator. This just helps with overall mission and branding while providing scaffolded support for new community members.
  • I would suggest the language around, "This site  is indieweb powered...again more market penetration language) by tools to support the principles of our community. Different APIs and protocols allow us to publish on our own site, share our work across many networks, and collect mentions of our work across the social web.
  • For folks like Swerty who have released a client into the wild (an awesome aAndroid app called indigenous currently in Alpha) there needs to be langauge about compatibility. I think here you need to mention specific protocols since different sites may use different idieweb tools. Maybe something like This app is indieweb compatible. It will publish to any indiweb powered site by using MicroPub and it also supports webmentions. No need for a validation tool. If the product doesn't work no one will use it.

 

Greg McVerry

22nd Women’s Studies Conference “#FeministIn(ter)ventions: Women, Community, Technology #edtechchat #literacies #clmooc

Asking for a quick favor. We are working feverishly on the #FeministIn(ter)ventions conference. As a steering committee we just released the RFP.  Please spread the

6 min read

Asking for a quick favor. We are working feverishly on the (ter)ventions conference. As a steering committee we just released the RFP.  Please spread the word.
 
 
The 22nd Women’s Studies Conference
“#FeministIn(ter)ventions:
Women, Community, Technology”
 
To be held on the campus of Southern Connecticut State University
Friday and Saturday, April 15th and 16th, 2016
 
Submission Deadline:                                            By December 4th, 2015
 
INVITATION FOR PROPOSALS ON INTERDISCIPLINARY SCHOLARLY AND CREATIVE WORK
 
The 22nd SCSU Women’s Studies conference aims to provide a critical site of collective inquiry into the intersections of women (and girls), community, and technology.  In what ways have women and girls worked with technology, broadly defined, for the advancement of communities and/or shaping and building movements?  We invite proposals that investigate the past, present, and future of the intersections of women, community, and technology and showcase feminist in(ter)ventions with technology.  How have women and girls participated (or not) in the fields of technology?  In what ways does this inquiry intersect with the studies of gender, race, class, and sexuality?
 
We, too, invite you to submit proposals that consider some of the following inquireis on women, community, and technology.  In what ways have feminist practices and women’s movements impacted women’s place in the world of technology?  How might the interplay between women, community, and technology have shifted feminist discourses?  What are some of the global movements that underscore feminist interventions and inventions of technology?  What lessons may we glean from women in communities throughout the world utilizing media and technology in fighting against war and destruction? What are some of the best practices of feminist in(ter)ventions for sustainable communities?
 
 
PROPOSAL FORMAT: Faculty, students, staff, administrators, and community activists from all disciplines and fields are invited to submit proposals for individual papers, complete sessions, panels, or round tables.  Poster sessions, performance pieces, video recordings, and other creative works are also encouraged.  For individual papers, please submit a one-page abstract.  For complete panels, submit a one-page abstract for each presentation plus an overview on the relationship among individual components.  For the poster sessions and artwork, submit a one-page overview.  All proposals must include speaker’s/speakers’ name(s), affiliation(s), and contact information (address, E-mail, & telephone number).  Please also indicate preference for Friday afternoon, Saturday morning or Saturday afternoon; all attempts will be made to honor schedule requests.
 
PANELS: Each 75-minute session usually includes three presenters and a session moderator, but individual presenters may request an entire session for a more substantial paper or presentation. Presenters are encouraged, though not required, to form their own panels.  The conference committee will group individual proposals into panels and assign a moderator.   Please indicate in your contact information if you are willing to serve as a moderator.
 
POSTERS, ART DISPLAYS, AND SLIDE PRESENTATIONS: A poster presentation consists of an exhibit of materials that report research activities or informational resources in visual & summary form.  An art display consists of a depiction of feminist and Indigenous concerns in an artistic medium.  Both types of presentations provide a unique platform that facilitates personal discussion of work with interested colleagues & allows meeting attendees to browse through highlights of current research.  Please indicate in your proposal your anticipated needs in terms of space, etc.
 
In keeping with the conference theme, suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
Women & the Media
Girls Who Code
Black Girls Code
Feminist Apps
Feminist Ethics & Technology
Feminism, Environment, and Technology
Women, Sustainability, and Technology
Gender, Class, and Technology
Gender, Sexuality, and Technology
Gender and Healthcare Technology
Feminist Values and STEM
Gender and STEM Ethnics
Women in STEM
Women in the History of STEM
Women Making History & STEM
Reproductive Technologies and Feminist Concerns
Feminist Pedagogy and Technology
Teaching with Social Media/Technology
Women, Technology, and Academia
Feminist Knowledge and Media Technology
Digital Humanities
Gender and Social Media/Technology
Girlhood in the Age of Social Media
Community (Re-)Building and Technology
Women’s Leadership, Media, and Technology
Women’s Labor & Technology
Women, Movements, and Technology
Spirituality and Technology
Religion, Gender, and STEM
Representation of Women & Social Media
Gender, Sexual Violence, and Technology
Anti-Sexual Violence and Media Technology
Cyber Bullying
First Amendment Rights & Emerging Technologies
Women Bloggers
Women Making Social Media
Feminist Social Media
Feminist Blogging
Black Twitter Feminism
Gender, Race, and Social Media
Online “Mommy” Communities
Social Media and Movements
Women in the Global South & Technology
Indigenous Women & Technology
 
We also invite your ideas and suggestions.  Conference sessions will juxtapose global, comparative, intersectional, interdisciplinary, and intergenerational perspectives for the collective re-thinking of women, community, and technology. Expect serious fun through meals and performance, with women, girls and their allies speaking of their struggles and power.
 
Submission Deadline:                                                ​December 4th, 2015
 
Please submit proposals and supporting materials to:
 
Women’s Studies Conference Committee
Women’s Studies Program, EN B 229
Southern Connecticut State University
501 Crescent Street
New Haven, CT 06515
 
Or via E-mail to:
womenstudies@southernct.edu, with attention to Conference Committee.  If you have any questions, please call the Women’s Studies office at (203) 392-6133.
Please include name, affiliation, E-mail, standard mailing address, and phone number. Proposals should be no longer than one page, with a second page for identification information. Panel Proposals are welcome.
 
The Women’s Studies Conference at SCSU is self-supporting; all presenters can pre-register at the discounted presenter’s fee.  The fee includes all costs for supporting materials, entrance to keynote events, and all meals and beverage breaks. 
CLMOOC

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