Skip to main content

My quick thoughts, back stage, and rants as I try to Teach kids about the Web while learning how to help others build a better Web.

IndieWebRing

Come Journey Through the IndieWeb Sites

‚Üź ūüēłūüíć ‚Üí

Greg McVerry

Carving out Room For Subjectives in New Educational Spaces #edu522

My Who Am I Post

3 min read

In every conversation you hear calls to get back to school, to "Get back to Normal."

I don't like the old normal. Normal did not work for the majority of our children. Especially black, brown, and indigenous kids.

I want to serve up something new.

So to illustrate my subjectives for this class I decided to learn a bit more whittling and carve up a spoon.

wooden sppon unfisinished

I believe we must mix up perspectives and I am hoping to accomplish two projects in this class:

  • A digital handbook on how to blog using WordPress and the SemPress theme
  • An autoethnography on me learning to build a poetry page as I taught a LEP Tech class and participated in the IndieWeb movement

Eat Your Own Cooking

As I try to stir up good trouble in my career I use a lens of digitally engaged scholarship. Borrowing from community engage scholarship I can not separate my creative activity, teaching, and service. These three, I believe, need to work together in service to the greater good in partnership with communities and learners

For the last few years much of these efforts for me have revolved around the IndieWeb movement. I help an amazing group of web activists. We started the Elm City Webmakers, run a free tech camp for teens in New Haven, and organize events all over the world. Developers release amazing technology that re-envisions the web as our social network.

Recently the IndieWeb community, in continuous reflections on diversity and inclusiuon metaphors, adopted a metaphor of "eat your own cooklng" to replace the metaphor of "self dog-fooding." This just means using the stuff you build and building stuff to use rather than just talking about building.

So I thought the spoon made a good physical metaphor for my subjectives. I always thought of my pocket knife as my original 3-d printer. It just works backwards much like an autoethnography. I also want to stir up good trouble to start recentering the web in marginalized communities.

Cook With Others

Recently at the IndieWeb West conference I facilitated a session on Cooking For Others. I am glad we moved on from the idea of self-dogfooding, but I wanted to try and get at something else. It's hard for me to describe, still working out the idea but for many they come to movements and communities, out of a sense of duty to others.

The idea of only using what you build made Silicon Valley billionaires. The model works. I just wonder if it works for everyone. Maybe it is a bit of mindset and not just metaphors we need to shift.

At the same time I will never ask my students to do something I will not do. So I am asking you to learn something new and be open about the process. Therefore I needed to the same.

I guess me learnining how to whittle is my attempt. I carved a missing chess pawn when we went camping with neighbors and I recently found myself desperate for an evening distraction. I work around the clock M-R and my partner works at a restautant W-S.

Basically stare at a screen all day. Have binged everything bingebale on all the networks (well still need to finsih the 100) and haven't done any kidless adulting, or any social gatherings since March.

Why not just stare at a fire and whittle wood? Sharing my carving will be the dish I bring to our table. I can not wait to see what tales you serve up.

Greg McVerry

Ideas for Digital #literacies lessons #edu407

Make a Podcast Here is my 2toPonder series and my son's podcast series. Want to make a podcast, just record on your phone or laptop and

2 min read

Make a Podcast

Here is my 2toPonder series and my son's podcast series. Want to make a podcast, just record on your phone or laptop and upload the file somewhere.

Use Paper

In my literacy mantra I made a flip book like explanation. I just stacked my phone camera on a bunch of books.

I also do little clip art talks with paper cut outs

You can do "In Plain English" style videos. I always pre write a script. I like to divide it into three columns, the text, me, and ay actions.

 

Use a Voice Animation Program

Use a Sock Puppet App

This is one of many sock puppets apps on iOS devices that kids love.

Use a text to Speech App

These are fun as all you have to do is type and it gets converted to text. So many uses in the langauge arts classroom.

I made a video about RSS Planets recently for .

Do a Pecha Flickr

You can make a timeline

TimelineJS is a great tool. You turn a Google spreasheet into an interactive multimedia task.

Use Movie Making Apps

So many choices for movie making apps. Yoiu can make book trailers in iOS, short clips in Animoto or try WeVideo on Chrome.

Use an Animation App

There are so many choices on different platforms for animation apps. The key is to remember to enhance your pedagogical goal. What is the animation giving you that just talking to the camera wouldn't? Time is precious.

Use Poetry

 

More poetry ideas

Make a Website

From a fake Facebook page, movie posters, poems to a Star Wars crawler. You can use ELA content to master the basics of how we read, write, and participate online.

Check out this collection of activities

 

Greg McVerry

Writing Documentary Poetry #clmooc #nctevillage #sschat #engchat #writingcommuniy

A Backstage Post Peaking into Two Poems

2 min read

Our class has gotten busy crafting documentary poetry. As we study disciplinary this lesson gave us the chance to look at connections between history and Language Arts.

If you want to get involved we added lesson plans and examples to our class wiki

I wrote mine today about the Strawberry Moon (the first full moon in June). My origninal idea I wanted to have a young First Nations child on the shores of Maine lambasting the fall of their people....75%-90% of Alogonquin (a language group on many First Nations)  gout wiped by Small Pox alone.

Yet the more research I conducted the more resilience I saw in a people's fighting for their cultural survival. Did you know citizens of Canada can, and do enlist in US Armed Forces? That into the 1970s parents of "mixed race" children would abandon their kids on resevrations in Canada into the 1970s? That the Wabanaki Confederacy, who fought along side settleres and colonists reformed in 1993?

So much history.

The first poem I wrote focused on the rebirth of the Wabanaki Council. I set out in the tradition of documentary poetry to cast light into darkness but the more I learned the more I got moved. The more I get moved the more my poetry gets affected.

Strawberry Moon

In the second poem I responded to Kevin's poem about having different names for the moon. Many cultures have names for the first full month in June but in the US most of of our lore traces back to Native roots. So I wrote a poem called Lost Words.

Lost Words

It took a bit of research to write these. I list my sources below:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/claudia-julien/grandmothers-statement-from-the-wabanaki-confederacy-c...

https://www.al.com/news/2020/06/strawberry-moon-2020-get-a-look-at-junes-full-moon-tonight-and-tomor...

https://www.the-sun.com/lifestyle/tech/939053/strawberry-moon-lunar-event-tonight/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abenaki#United_States

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabanaki_Confederacy

http://www.muiniskw.org/pgCulture3.htm

https://archive.org/details/algonquinleg00lelarich/page/n21/mode/2up

https://www.healthandenvironment.org/environmental-health/social-context/history/precautionary-princ...

http://www.nativetech.org/wigwam/phototour.html

Greg McVerry

Writing with Observations #EDU407 #clmooc #poemsofpresence #writingcommunity

When we write we often capture what we observe. Scientist write formal observations. Mathematicians may observe patterns. Literary experts see poetry. Each discipline takes its

2 min read

When we write we often capture what we observe. Scientist write formal observations. Mathematicians may observe patterns. Literary experts see poetry. Each discipline takes its own spin, but the basic skill remains.

Every writer should carry an observation notebook.  In fact journaling may improve student writing and positive perceptions of learning  (Connor-Greene, 2000). Yoru journal maybe a blog but the best authors never pockets empty of pens and paper.

Jot what you see.

Types of Observation Posts

An observation post can also provide a blogger stuck without an idea. Just look around and pcik something, jot down a few ideas in your notebook, and then write a post.

Ordinary Object

Choose an ordinary object like a pencil or a coffee cup. Describe it in great detail. For a challenge choose a metaphor or emotion to with the object.  Stare at your piece. Write down even the most minute details. Go to your blog and draft the post.

Take a Walk

Go outside. Every ten minutes stop for one minute and jot down what you see. Or just fall down, gaze up at the sky, and write.

Extraordinary Objects

Pick weird stuff. Jot down and share your description. 

Text Structure

Ever notice how the angles in YouTube videos change quickly and without transitions? These are called jump cuts. Pick a genre you are unfamiliar with and observe the text structure.

Time Lapse

Pick the same subject. Write about it in some time interval for a set period of time.

 

 Connor-Greene, P. A. (2000). Making connections: Evaluating the effectiveness of journal writing in enhancing student learning. Teaching of Psychology, 27(1), 44-46., P. A. (2000). Making connections: Evaluating the effectiveness of journal writing in enhancing student learning. Teaching of Psychology, 27(1), 44-46.

Greg McVerry

How a poem on cultural melanism came about #clmooc #poemsofpresence

mz_lat Interesting story on how I got there. An animal walked outside my windowbigger than a coyote,but can't be a Grey Wolf?? Could it??? Turns out its an

2 min read

mz_lat

Interesting story on how I got there.

An animal walked outside my window
bigger than a coyote,
but can't be a Grey Wolf?? Could it???

Turns out its an Eastern Coyote or Coywolf (though I do believe the Grey Wolf has returned to Connecticut, regardless of the legend of Putnam).

Trying to identify the species (found no prints or scat) lead to research on the word cline which turned into a poem comparing our partisan divide along fake geographic boundaries to the real geographic boundaries of evolutionary differences

Learning about cline lead me to the Peppered Moth.  While researching the history of the Peppered Moth I learned the term industrial melanism.

Given that anything cool in America starts off gay and/or Black I tied this into a term I coined as  "cultural melanism." White people poetry always about nature. There are not really any people doing .

Yet we owe so much of our form to African Diaspora Art and when another Black Man dies screaming, "I can't Breathe" while a jackbooted thug literally has his knee on his throat...

Felt wrong not to use my priiviledge to acknowledge this pain. To just write about pretty trees during a pandemic when majority of people have to stare at walls not the glorious landscapes of East Haddam.....

I think today I will continue with the Peppered Moth. Talk about how getting "whiter" is an awful but effective survival skill for Black students in school that doesn't work on law enforcement.

Greg McVerry

Five Universal Lessons for Writing Poetry and Living Life #clmooc #edu307

Observe your world. Write, live it. Embody meaning. Write and live through your senses. Embrace emotion. Channel joy through pain in word and life. Listen to sounds words

1 min read

  • Observe your world. Write, live it.
  • Embody meaning. Write and live through your senses.
  • Embrace emotion. Channel joy through pain in word and life.
  • Listen to sounds words paint across the sky.
  • Practice. Then Practice.

Greg McVerry

Hey #edu506 This module you need to make a lesson on a multimodal text here are a few examples

My advice is to first make a multimodal text.....See the Write task where I ask you to respond to a text with a multmodal text...you

3 min read

My advice is to first make a multimodal text.....See the Write task where I ask you to respond to a text with a multmodal text...you could use that.....

Make a text and design a lesson around it. This is what I did with https://jgregorymcverry.com/videos/howtowriteasciencepoem.mp4

I first did this planning on the Google Doc I can now turn this into a lesson plan.

I know this sounds backwards, and I never have you start with the product but you need to know you can make a multimodal text.

Technology Not Required

Mutlimodal does not mean digital and digital does not mean multimodal. My favorite way to teach students to read poetry is multimodal and has students design collages.

Make a Podcast

Here is my 2toPonder series and my poetry series. Want to make a podcast, just record on your phone or laptop and upload the file somewhere.

Use Paper

In my literacy mantra I made a flip book like explanation. I just stacked my phone camera on a bunch of books.

I also do little clip art talks with paper cut outs

You can do "In Plain English" style videos. I always pre write a script. I like to divide it into three columns, the text, me, and ay actions.

 

Use a Voice Animation Program

Use a Sock Puppet App

This is one of many sock puppets apps on iOS devices that kids love.

Use a text to Speech App

These are fun as all you have to do is type and it gets converted to text. So many uses in the langauge arts classroom.

I made a video about RSS Planets recently for .

Do a Pecha Flickr

 You can make a timeline

TimelineJS is a great tool. You turn a Google spreasheet into an interactive multimedia task.

Use Movie Making Apps

So many choices for movie making apps. Yoiu can make book trailers in iOS, short clips in Animoto or try WeVideo on Chrome.

Use an Animation App

There are so many choices on different platforms for animation apps. The key is to remember to enhance your pedagogical goal. What is the animation giving you that just talking to the camera wouldn't? Time is precious.

Use Poetry

 

More poetry ideas

Make a Website

From a fake Facebook page, movie posters, poems to a Star Wars crawler. You can use ELA content to master the basics of how we read, write, and participate online.

Check out this collection of activities

Greg McVerry

Meeting My Goals for @IndieWebCamp Austin Project Day

...It's a few hours late but whose website is ever done? They should be the rough draft of your life. I had three things I wanted

2 min read

...It's a few hours late but whose website is ever done? They should be the rough draft of your life.

I had three things I wanted to work on as I remoted into IndieWebCamp Austin

  • A Poetry Page
  • A Calendar Page of all my poems
  • A Notes Feed
  • ¬†

Poetry Page

I like the way my poetry page turned out. I started at IWC Navrongo last week but I kept messing up the grid.

It was half errant closing tags and three quarters mistakes in my Grid. I returned to Grid By Example, started over and got it done.

I will mess with the fonts some, may add some boders but it works well.

Poetry Port Poems

This page was a lot of fun. More importantly I learned a ton about how different tools that use microformats work.

Notes Page

I am trying to build a feed for my notes. Currently I publish them individually and there is no way to read them all. The main motivation of the poetry page was to see if I could build a calender view of my notes.

I am going to take the lessons I learned building the poetry port page and fix up my notes feed between now and next IWC....I think there is a bit of break...February was crazy busy.

 

Greg McVerry

So My Last #poetryPort Poem for remix failed, which to me is no better way to honor that which is all poetry, remix

It was supposed to live here at https://jgregorymcverry.com/heavenlyremixes It was a remix of me, some NASA images, and inspiration and words from Alistair Reynolds. Work is

6 min read

It was supposed to live here at https://jgregorymcverry.com/heavenlyremixes It was a remix of me, some NASA images, and inspiration and words from Alistair Reynolds.

Work is hard science poetry. Gotta slog through universe development but I dig the questions left in spaces between words.

Poem didn't work. I messed it up. I think might just be the image size. I was trying to go smaller. Too tired to test, but make sense.

Anywhoo heres  how the poem could have danced in a new light in a darkened room:

The margins just me chasing words I know are there. Kinda how poetry works.

<div id="darkstar">
      <!-- Goal is to have each div fade in and out on the 3 second counter-->
     
     <div  class="crashes">
       <p class="myjam">All stars sing<br />
        remixing<br />
            the first<br />
        beat<br /></p>
     </div>
       <div class="pouring">
       <p class="myjam">outer layers <br />
           belting tunes<br />
      in heaven's lonely embrace</p>
     </div>
     <div class="light">
       <p class="myjam">Rhythms arise<br />
        spun on quantum tectronics<br />
      needle oscilliating<br />
    from the core</p>
     </div>
     <div class="intoAshes">
       <p class="myjam">As the galaxies<br />
        dance to their<br /></p>
     </div>
      <div class="ReasonTatters">
       <p class="myjam">own rhytm
      </p>
     </div>
      <div class="ForcesTear">
       <p class="myjam">as we whistle </p>
     </div>
      <div class="LooseFromAxis">
       <p class="myjam">to the same tune</p>
     </div>
     
    </div>

> div {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    color: transparent;
    opacity: 0;
    z-index: 0;
    -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden;
    -webkit-animation: imageAnimation 21s linear infinite 0s;
    -moz-animation: imageAnimation 21s linear infinite 0s;
    -o-animation: imageAnimation 21s linear infinite 0s;
    -ms-animation: imageAnimation 21s linear infinite 0s;
    animation: imageAnimation 21s linear infinite 0s;
}

> div:nth-child(2)  {
    -webkit-animation-delay: 3s;
    -moz-animation-delay: 3s;
    -o-animation-delay: 3s;
    -ms-animation-delay: 3s;
    animation-delay: 3s;
}
> div:nth-child(3) {
    -webkit-animation-delay: 6s;
    -moz-animation-delay: 6s;
    -o-animation-delay: 6s;
    -ms-animation-delay: 6s;
    animation-delay: 6s;
}
> div:nth-child(4) {
    -webkit-animation-delay: 9s;
    -moz-animation-delay: 9s;
    -o-animation-delay: 9s;
    -ms-animation-delay: 9s;
    animation-delay: 9s;
}
> div:nth-child(5) {
    -webkit-animation-delay: 12s;
    -moz-animation-delay: 12s;
    -o-animation-delay: 12s;
    -ms-animation-delay: 12s;
    animation-delay: 12s;
}

> div:nth-child(6) {
    -webkit-animation-delay: 15s;
    -moz-animation-delay: 15s;
    -o-animation-delay: 15s;
    -ms-animation-delay: 15s;
    animation-delay: 15s;
}

> div:nth-child(7) {
    -webkit-animation-delay: 18s;
    -moz-animation-delay: 18s;
    -o-animation-delay: 18s;
    -ms-animation-delay: 18s;
    animation-delay: 18s;
}
.crashes  {
  background:  url("/photos/DarkStar/shallwego.jpg") no-repeat fixed center;
}
.pouring  {
  background:  url("/photos/DarkStar/youandiwhilewecan.jpg") no-repeat fixed center;
}
.light  {
  background:  url("/photos/DarkStar/throughthetransitivenightfall.jpg") no-repeat fixed center;
}
.intoAshes  {
  background:  url("/photos/DarkStar/ofdiamonds.jpg") no-repeat fixed center;
}

.ReasonTatters  {
  background:  url("/photos/DarkStar/mirrorshattersinformless.jpg") no-repeat fixed center;
}
.ForcesTear  {
  background:  url("/photos/DarkStar/reflectiosnofmatter.jpg") no-repeat fixed center;
}
.LooseFromAxis {
  background:  url("/photos/DarkStar/glasshanddissolving.jpg") no-repeat fixed center;
}

.myjam  {
color:white;
font-size:5.7vh;
margin-top:-20%;
margin-letf: 20%;
}
  @-webkit-keyframes imageAnimation {
    0% { opacity: 0;
    -webkit-animation-timing-function: ease-in; }
    8% { opacity: 1;
         -webkit-animation-timing-function: ease-out; }
    17% { opacity: 1 }
    25% { opacity: 0 }
    100% { opacity: 0 }
}

@-moz-keyframes imageAnimation {
    0% { opacity: 0;
    -moz-animation-timing-function: ease-in; }
    8% { opacity: 1;
         -moz-animation-timing-function: ease-out; }
    17% { opacity: 1 }
    25% { opacity: 0 }
    100% { opacity: 0 }
}

@-o-keyframes imageAnimation {
    0% { opacity: 0;
    -o-animation-timing-function: ease-in; }
    8% { opacity: 1;
         -o-animation-timing-function: ease-out; }
    17% { opacity: 1 }
    25% { opacity: 0 }
    100% { opacity: 0 }
}


@keyframes imageAnimation {
    0% { opacity: 0;
    animation-timing-function: ease-in; }
    8% { opacity: 1;
         animation-timing-function: ease-out; }
    17% { opacity: 1 }
    25% { opacity: 0 }
    100% { opacity: 0 }
}

Greg McVerry

Poetry is Risk A #clmooc #poetryport poem as a gift to poets willing to risk it all spilling truth in their falsehoods #writingcommunity

Poetry is risk verse running into&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; dangerunwanted events&nbsp;&nbsp;spilled on &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; paperAs probability of poetry puddles inhuman miseryExpectations of hopegrounded in fearobjective becomessubjectiveprosody of brokenwordsin rebel

1 min read

Poetry is risk
verse running into
                  danger
unwanted events
  spilled on
            paper
As probability of
poetry puddles in
human misery
Expectations of hope
grounded in fear
objective becomes
subjective
prosody of broken
words
in rebel poets
18 whiskeys deep
"mad bad, dangerous to know"
        Poetry spits in the face of
probability of errors
     embraces the sin in syntax
A primary prevention
of the human condition
     slipping      into the     mundane
with songs humane, to keep us sane
sorrow found in the wind
and rain of Autumn
soaking souls of
history
"You are a man.
Isn’t this reason enough to die?"
poetry is freedom

CLMOOC

Prev | Home | Join | ? | Next