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My quick thoughts, back stage, and rants as I try to Teach kids about the Web while learning how to help others build a better Web.

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Greg McVerry

My #100DaysQuotesofColor Challenge #literacies

After Marcelle Haddix keynote at the Literacy Research Association I examined my last theory of change for a #literacies grant and realized I did not

1 min read

After Marcelle Haddix keynote at the Literacy Research Association I examined my last theory of change for a #literacies grant and realized I did not cite one scholar of color.

I spent the intersession learning and reading about scholars of color in the field of education. While it is a risk of pithy appropriation, rather than deep understanding, decided to do a #100DaysOfQuotesOfColor.

Every day I share a quote from someone I am learning about with an image from an artist who support the Commons.

Long term I am doing a dive into the work of Maisha Winn, @David E. Kirkland, and  others to find the stories of reading and writing that better represent the world than my last attempt: https://jgregorymcverry.com/theoryofchange

I love Dewey and Jim Gee but they both have enough citations. there are tangential fields in critical race theory, art history, AND scholars in my own  field whose work I and other have ignored for too long.

Greg McVerry

Writing Tip for #edu307

As a writing intensive class I must assign 25% of the grade we make up together at the end of class to revisions. I believe more

2 min read

As a writing intensive class I must assign 25% of the grade we make up together at the end of class to revisions.

I believe more in revising forward rather than backward (Which comes with a nasty dose of proofread after publishing). Meaning instead of going back and fixing stuff you already published I want to see writers who take feedback from me and their peers and use it in future writing.

We will of course edit some work. That's a key difference between traditional long form writing and blogging in a way. So in our longer pieces you will track areas of improvement and show how you addressed criterion in your revisions.

Writing Tip One From Module One

A reaction or a synthesis piece goes far beyond a summary. I read the three articles assigned. No need to rehash each paragraph for me.

Take a stand. Show emotion. Get drawn to a quote. Find a connection to your personal life....Start by thinking I must transform these words to transform my thoughts.

We already submitted summaries in our "read" post. Search for creativity and connections.

So here is the tip (beyond please pre-write...makes your life and my life better): Spend time just focusing on "your message" not the readings. Check out the example below:

screenshot of text being edited from

Just watch how word choice strengthens the author's position. Think about what you want to say....Then say it. Then return to your notes from the readings. Decide what fits where in proving that what you wrote will ring true for all.

Greg McVerry

Greg McVerry

Updated Code of Conduct for Summer Classes #DigPed

  Code of Conduct 1. Purpose A primary goal of #edu407 is is to be inclusive to our community of readers and writers, with the most varied and

8 min read

 

Code of Conduct

1. Purpose

A primary goal of #edu407 is is to be inclusive to our community of readers and writers, with the most varied and diverse backgrounds possible. As such, we are committed to providing a friendly, safe and welcoming environment for all, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, ability, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion (or lack thereof).

This code of conduct outlines our expectations for all those who participate in our community, as well as the consequences for unacceptable behavior.

We invite all those who participate in #edu407  to help us create safe and positive experiences for everyone.

As a college course in children's literacy you promise to participate in your fullest, complete class assignments on time, reflect on your learning, engage in college level writing, and critical analysis in both written and spoken word. You understand that success in this class determines on meeting these basic expectations.

2. Your Control Your Data

You have the right in this  class to work from your own domain where you publish your data. This might be a blogger account, a wix page, or a WordPress blog but this LMS can't collect your data. You have the right to delete your data at any time.

You may also choose to use tools provided by the University such as Blackboard. As a faculty member I can make no promises as to how this data is collected and used by the University. As a tuition paying learner you should be aware the university is collecting large amounts of data through our Learning Management System.  I make no claims about the security nor learner control of this data.

3. Right to Privacy

While this class is built on and encourages open pedagogy you will never be required to share any task or assignment. You may password protect your blog or website and share the password with just the class or just with me. Anything posted to Blackboard is considered private only to class.

While many of us syndicate to social media you are never required to join any network beyond our private chat rooms. If an assignment revolves around social media a transcript or video can be provided to anyone who does not wish to join or interact with social media silos.

At the end of class you may delete your blog and your stream account. I can make no promises about the learner data in Blackboard after completion of the class.

4. Public, Private, and Open

What does public and "in the open" mean?

Online communication, such as tweets, blog posts, and comments are generally out in the open and technically ‚Äúpublic‚ÄĚ and available for researchers to analyze and quote. Internet researchers have, however, documented how a particular communication may be technically public but viewed by the individual who posted it as meant for a more limited or private context.

Even if an individual feels that they have ‚Äúpublished‚ÄĚ in public or have consented to be part of research, they might still feel like trust has been violated if their words are taken up and re-framed in a way that they feel is out of context or misrepresented.

Think about each other when sharing information. Critical feedback helps us grow but keep that to our private stream. Use our public comments on each others blogs to encourage growth of the learner and the community.

If someone posts to Blackboard and not their public blog that is considered 100% private and can not be quoted or summarized in public posts without author permission.

Even if your data is technically public I will always ask for approval before direct quoting or including any artifact you make in class as part of a study,

5. Expected Behavior

The following behaviors are expected and requested of all community members:

  • Participate in an authentic and active way. In doing so, you contribute to the health and longevity of this community.
  • Exercise consideration and respect in your speech and actions.
  • Attempt collaboration before conflict.
  • Refrain from demeaning, discriminatory, or harassing behavior and speech.
  • Provide feedback to your peers
  • Answer questions when you can and help point people in the right direction when you can't

6. Unacceptable Behavior

The following behaviors are considered harassment and are unacceptable within our community:

  • Violence, threats of violence or violent language directed against another person.
  • Sexist, racist, homophobic, transphobic, ableist or otherwise discriminatory jokes and language.
  • Posting or displaying sexually explicit or violent material.
  • Posting or threatening to post other people‚Äôs personally identifying information ("doxing").
  • Personal insults, particularly those related to gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, or disability.
  • Inappropriate photography or recording.
  • Incessentaly correcting graamer
  • Inappropriate physical contact. You should have someone‚Äôs consent before touching them.
  • Unwelcome sexual attention. This includes, sexualized comments or jokes; inappropriate touching, groping, and unwelcomed sexual advances.
  • Deliberate intimidation, stalking or following (online or in person).
  • Advocating for, or encouraging, any of the above behavior.
  • Sustained disruption of community events, including talks and presentations.

7. Consequences of Unacceptable Behavior

Unacceptable behavior from any community member will not be tolerated.

Anyone asked to stop unacceptable behavior is expected to comply immediately.

If a community member engages in unacceptable behavior, the course instructor may refer you to proper university channels and it can threaten your standing in the program.

8. No Notification Policy

When in class I would never ask you not to have a laptop or cell phone. That contains way more computing power than we took to the moon. I do ask for attention. So do a lot of companies who drill into your brain through notifications.

There is also replicable evidence from learning sciences that using paper and not computer notes leads to greater knowledge gains.

I ask that when in class you globally turn off notifications. When working online dedicate yourself to class. Shut down any sms notifications, close all social media tabs not related to class, and learn.

Notifications work like drugs. Literally. Brain scientists work for companies and study how to make you click more. Stay attention sober during class.

8. No Driving

You are expressively forbidden to complete any activity or interact with any other person in this class while operating a vehicle. Doing so puts others at risks and therefore falls under unacceptable behavior. Plus its illegal (in Connecticut), so there is that too.

9. Video Data

If this class involves video projects you will never be required to show your face. If you do a group project all group members must consent before a video upload. Any group member has the right of refusal. You can email mcverryj1@southernct.edu if your would like to ask for a video removal without letting your other group members know.

10. Reporting Guidelines

If you are subject to or witness unacceptable behavior, or have any other concerns, please notify me at mcverryj1@southernct.edu

Additionally, I am available to help community members engage with university and  local law enforcement or to otherwise help those experiencing unacceptable behavior feel safe.

I am also a mandatory reporter and any mention in class of self-harm, hurting others, or reports of abuse must be reported. In a class where we write reflections and fictions often based in reality the line for a mandatory reporter can be blurred. I will always default

11. Addressing Grievances

If you feel you have been falsely or unfairly accused of violating this Code of Conduct, you should notify mcverryj1@southernj1  with a concise description of your grievance. Your grievance will be handled in accordance with our existing governing policies.

As a  social justice university we will prioritizes marginalized people’s safety over privileged people’s comfort. I reserve the right not to act on complaints regarding:

  • ‚ÄėReverse‚Äô -isms, including ‚Äėreverse racism,‚Äô ‚Äėreverse sexism,‚Äô and ‚Äėcisphobia‚Äô
  • Reasonable communication of boundaries, such as ‚Äúleave me alone,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúgo away,‚ÄĚ or ‚ÄúI‚Äôm not discussing this with you.‚ÄĚ
  • Communicating in a ‚Äėtone‚Äô you don‚Äôt find congenial
  • Criticizing racist, sexist, cissexist, or otherwise oppressive behavior or assumptions

12. Scope

We expect all students¬† to abide by this Code of Conduct in online and in-person‚Äďas well as in all one-on-one communications pertaining to class business.

This code of conduct and its related procedures also applies to unacceptable behavior occurring outside the scope of community activities when such behavior has the potential to adversely affect the safety and well-being of community members.

13. Contact info

mcverryj1@southernct.edu

14. License and attribution

This Code of Conduct is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license.

Portions of text derived from the Django Code of Conduct and the Geek Feminism Anti-Harassment Policy.

Portions of this text were derived from  XOXO a CC-BY license

Retrieved on November 22, 2016 from http://citizencodeofconduct.org/

 

Greg McVerry

Responses from Twitter on my idea of replacing Knowledge Brokering with Knowledge Knitting #oer19 #oer

In reply to My rando thoughts @francesbell@glittrgirl Hey both, can you help? @jgmac1106 is "collecting recent (older would be even better) references to knitting or quilts

3 min read

In reply to My rando thoughts

@francesbell@glittrgirl Hey both, can you help? @jgmac1106 is "collecting recent (older would be even better) references to knitting or quilts that have come up at #oer conferences want to reframe knowledge brokering as knowledge kniting in our agentive apprenticeship model."

There lot of references to quilts at the year‚Äôs OER19 because of @KateMfD keynote. I did a search of Twitter for ‚Äú#OER19 quilt‚ÄĚ very productive ‚Äú#OER19 knit‚ÄĚ one surprise. You could do this for each year‚Äôs hashtag then follow up blog streams of tweeters. David Gauntlett?-

Thx @FranceBell why knowledge knitting, because i do not like the metaphor of knowledge brokering and social capital. To me learning and innovation is not an economic model. Need a new metaphor for quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com/2019/03/07/my-…

@ltaub has written beautifully about weaving as knowledge work. I do agree this is different to the metaphorical lean that comes with brokering. It’s about craft practices, craft resources and craft product. What we make together.

Yes I like these metaphors for making stuff alone and collectively. I quite often think about writing as bringing different 'threads' together and there are of course also threads of posts which add up to conversations.

and in my idea of agentive apprenticeship, which is how learning happens in innovation systems this weaving is both done by humans, networks, and spaces until patterns emerge that become stable much like craft and quilts

I also wanted to pick an artisanal industry to capture the #feminist #pedagogy needed in innovation systems if they will ever have real impact at the system level. While I am at risk by picking an engendered art I feel it is more an honoring of tradition. way learning always be

I think instead of trying to write up this section of the chapter I might just have to quote this thread. What you folks speak of is beauty. Always wonder how better the world would be if argumentation wasn't considered our highest form of discourse.

You have all taught me this is where decolonization must be...I believe the heteronormative practice of argumentation as Truth so rooted in the Western world is just as responsible for history as any accident of latitude. It's all attitude.

Begin*not be
but then can it be
before it begins
An open
Before existance
Maybe it is
Be
Shit. Is this what Shakespeare
meant?
Chicken, egg?

 

Greg McVerry

Submitted Application for the @Mozilla Responsible Computer Science Challenge

Concept Description:   The Computer Science Department, Research Center on Computing and Society, and School of Education at Southern Connecticut State University propose this work to fund

21 min read

Concept Description:

 

The Computer Science Department, Research Center on Computing and Society, and School of Education at Southern Connecticut State University propose this work to fund the creation of a Virtual Reality recording and editing studio, with accompanying coursework on storytelling and WebVR.

Specifically, this project will fund the creation of the VR lab and openly licensed pedagogical materials other computer science departments could use to learn ethics, WebVR , or both. Through these courses students will create scalable, remixable content around issues of ethics in computer science in order to leave our program understanding of ethics as a first-design principle.

The project will proceed in two stages. The Responsible Computer Science Challenge award will fund the first stage. During the first stage we will develop the animation and WebVR lab as well as the curriculum. Successful results of this stage will lead us to seek follow up funding to design a dual-purpose Virtual Reality live recording studio while maintaining planetarium functionality.

Stage One, funded by the Responsible Computer Science Challenge, is a formative design research project that revolves around the  pedagogical goal of understanding how perspectives, history, and personality shape ethics and technology. We will develop a class cross listed in philosophy and computer science will teach digital storytelling through narratives of ethics and revise computer science classes in web design and security to include WebVR.

SCSU  is uniquely qualified for this award. Our Research Center on Computing and Society, founded and led by Terrell Ward Bynum, has explored the ethics of computer science and technology since 1988. Dr Heidi Lockwood, Professor of Philosophy, will join the project. Dr. Lisa Lancor, Professor and Chair of the Computer Science Department will serve as Principal Investigator on the Project. Dr. Greg McVerry, Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Learning, and long-time Mozilla contributor, will lead our efforts to facilitate the development of course curricula  that align our long history of exploring ethics and computer science with theories of open pedagogy.

Theoretical Principles

We draw on John Dewey and see digital literacies and ethics in computer science as necessary for efforts in democratic education. The pedagogy used will center around production-based inquiry methods. We will also encourage all participants to reflect openly on a blogging platform. We will encourage further involvement of the larger Mozilla WebVR community in the project

Why WebVR

We believe webVR has the greatest reach and impact when teaching ethics. While the cost of full virtual reality rigs and the computer to power these systems are out of reach for most of the global population, WebVR is accessible to anyone with a phone and Mozilla’s virtual reality web browser.

Open Pedagogy

Every participant will have their own website domain and a  content management system. Our theoretical underpinning is that agency and belief in oneself as a writer is essential in order to engage in the reflective thought required in ethics education. In today’s networked society (Castells & Cardozza, 2006), a new set of skills and practices have emerged, and we must design for diversity and inclusivity by acknowledging computer science has not been a safe space (boyd, 2018) (1,137 characters)

Formative Design

Collect Baseline Data

We will begin with focus group interviews with students who have completed CSC 235 Web and Database Development and ask about how they felt the class integrated lessons of technology and allowed them to develop their own space online. This class will include introductions to building A-Frame as students learn HTML.

We will also collect efficacy data about how participants feel towards storytelling. They will be asked to choose a picutre from a set and explain how the picture represents how they feel about their skill level. 

Develop Learning Interventions

We will then create and file the necessary paperwork for our new and revised courses. These courses will be designed in conjunction with our students and assigned a license that allows for . We will work with Mozillians already creating content on Glitch to develop WebVR tutorials.

Implement Interventions

We will then implement the courses and collect student feedback. The class will be open to SCSU for credit but open to global participants to play and contribute. Data will be triangulated using their blog posts and plus delta charts at multiple time points.

Analyze Data

After the first run of classes we will analyze the data to determine which factors inhibited and which factors supported our pedagogical goals.

Iterate on Learning Interventions

We will then revise the coursework and run the classes again.

Analyze Data

Finally, we will analyze  data one last time using content analysis to identify themes that brought us closer to our pedagogical goals.

 

 

 

Working Open:

 

We will open this project to the wider computer science and WebVR world. In fact, as we write this proposal, we welcome Pull Requests and issues at GitHub

Open Begins on Your Own Domain

As we develop this project, all participants will be encouraged to blog and share their reflections and learnings.  We believe working open involves not only "documenting and sharing your concept with broader audiences",  but inviting  audiences to get involved and help shape both the project and our openly networked space for learning.

To this end, all participants from the PI to each student will be given a url and a blog. We will use a social reader and technologies called to connect learners.

Open Pedagogy

The two courses designed for this class will carry an open license. In fact, they will be built using readily available tools. Members of Mozilla's WebVR community have already expressed interest in both designing and taking the course.

Open Data and Privacy

No participant will be required to share openly and will have full control to license their own content as long as they meet the requirements of any reused code or previously licensed content.( 

 

 

 

Internet Health:

 

In a recent survey on Internet Health, specifically the future of connected devices, Mozilla found that those who identify as ultra nerds are more optimistic about the web than those not always online. This result mirror's danah boyd's twentieth anniversary critique of John Berry Barlow's original manifesto. Ultra-nerds come from a place of privilege, and this usually means white, male, and from the global north. We never designed the web for diversity because the original designers had never felt threatened, were never stalked. This explains why, even today, Amnesty International find female journalists get attacked every ten seconds online

In college I did have a stalker. It was a very scary experience. I come to technology with a different perspective because of that experience. It is not a matter of techno panic but a matter of self-preservation....lots of people in Silicon Valley who have never had a Stalker. They are not thinking like that. If you get more people involved that have had …well…Diversity improves technology in a way that makes regulation less necessary Stacey Higginbotham, This Week in Google.

We seek to improve internet health by ensuring that ethics, especially the areas of diversity and inclusion, gets taught as a principle of first design. WebVR provides a useful avenue for this approach as we can put hypothetical characters in situations that would not be ethical to do to real humans. Furthermore, early research into counseling, PTSD, and autism finds virtual reality may help to improve empathy.

We will utilize a series of case studies as models and encourage students to record and create A-Frame content. The use of a WebVR first approach also allows us to reach a much larger audience with our message of ethics in computer science. While the price point on high end virtual reality rig  the cost makes it inaccessible to almost 100% of the world population. Anyone with a smartphone and a compatible lens can use WebVR.

Our MVP case studies we propose and will develop with our students include:

  • Greening the Web: Do you really need React or Blockchain when HTML will do?
  • Code of Conduct: Better conferences or Kangaroo Court?
  • False Positives: Do Algorithms protect us?
  • HTML First: A Matter of ?

Our students will then work in distributed teams with open participants across the web to create additional case studies.

 

 

 

 

A scan of scholarly articles and a survey of virtual reality and computer science specialists found no evidence of anyone else trying to teach ethics through the use of WebVR. We posted messages to GitHub repos, Telegram, Twitter, and Slack in communities that focus on webVR.

While we did not find anyone currently doing similar work, we did find a large expressed interest from people who want to contribute. In fact, we are already collaborating with the two most popular A-Frame  teachers in the greater Mozilla networks.

However recent outreach on Twitter https://twitter.com/jgmac1106/status/1088453939861712897 lead to emergin connections to other researchers in the State of Connecticut may lead to partnerships on scale up efforts. 

 

 

 

 

Key Personnel

Dr. Lisa Lancor (an 8.3% effort, or 1.0)will enable her to oversee course development and program instruction as well as administration of the project funds. Dr. Lancor will also revise courses following their operation and analyze data collected.

Co-PI Greg McVerry (a 9.4% effort, or 1.13 Academic Months). He  will act as a pedagogy and instructional design expert helping to design courses. Dr. McVerry will also coordinate with third party developers creating learning tools. He will also devote 0.5 Summer Months above and beyond his normal duties to the project, for an additional 4.2% effort

Additional salary support for Co-PI Heidi Lockwood (a 2.7% effort, or 0.3 Summer Month) 4% of time will provide assistance in applying the philosophy of ethics to our course design.

Other Personnel

Student 1 $15 per hour for 20 hr/wk. This student will help to record and edit instructional videos, data collection, provide four hours of open online office hours for help, and spend four hours documenting the program through our website and social media.

Student 2 will be paid $12 per hour for 10 hr/wk  He or she will handle  office logistics and filing of university required paperwork. They will provide technical assistance in the lab during class time. 

Fringe Benefits

Fringe benefits for are protected under the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Dr. Lancor  64.70% rate on summer work; Dr. McVerry 83.47% rate on course release and 49.72% rate on summer; Dr. Lockwood  72.73% on summer work. Students do not receive fringe during the academic year.

Materials and Supplies

Insta360 Pro II Spherical VR 360 8K Camera, Extra Battery & Charger Kit, $6,000

 Audio recording equipment $4,000

3 Garmin VIRB 360 Action Camera $2,100

Audio remixing and studio equipment, $2,900

5 high-end desktops or laptops $20,0000

Other

  • Professional Installation, 2000 for the set-up of the audio recording studio
  • Developer, Malcom Blaney,¬†[FJ1]¬† at $75 for 65 hours.; Create a ledger and micropub client for issuing and recording webmention badges. and HTML.
  • Developer, Grant Richardson, $9,000 at $75 for 120 hours; Create a lightweight blogging CMS using nodejs. Include webmentions, indieauth, and micropub endpoints. Create a microformats parser for tracking class participation.¬†

Indirect Costs: SCSU maintains a negotiated indirect cost agreement with DHHS. Copies of SCSU’s NICRA are available upon request.

 

 

Risks:

 

As a university sponsored project, all research activity funded by this grant will require approval from the SCSU  Institutional Review Board and any consent and assent from participants.

Humane Tech isn't Engineered

Mindsets do not shift easily. Many developers look to engineer their way to the perfect social solution. This world belief that "Code can save the world, but only I can write it" traces its roots, as Sara Wachter-Boettcher (2017) points out, back to bias engineered into computer science since the 1950's when  identified loner men as the most apt for programming and then built assessments to identify these types of employees. Yet  of bias of perfection, impostor syndrome to explicit bias around competition, verbal discourse, and neurodiversity have weeded their way through all of our history (Banaji & Greenwald, 2017).

We cannot code our way to better community. While what we engineer reflects our bias, engineering alone can never overcome perspectives and pasts. Instead we must carve anew; placing our principles before our pull  requests. To overcome the risk of settled mindsets we will first put a focus on listening to voices who tech does not serve or has not served safely.

We will then root the story of ethics in Computer Science into the narratives of at-risk populations. We will study the shape of the story and come to understand how the prescriptive technologies (Ursula, 2004) control the shape of stories we tell. We will then create narratives through the webVR case studies.

This does introduce the risk of too many possibilities. Amy Burvall notes that constraints lead to greater creativity. We will mitigate this risk by first focusing on creating webVR using A-Frame technologies as a proof of concept before scaling up to a full virtual reality recording studio.

However, we will provide everyone with a Domain  of their own and a blog to ensure they own their stories.

Interdisciplinary Approach

Our use of webVR and A-Frame will require computer science engineers to study digital storytelling and narratology while English and education majors study computer science. The populations served by many community colleges and state universities in the United States have multiple jobs and families to raise. Adding additional domains of knowledge to already crowded curriculum can add stress to the lives of students.

To mitigate these risks, we will add additional scaffolds, a network of open participants, bi-monthly face to face meetings, and on-demand video tutorials.  We will also stress importance of community in Open Pedagogy and encourage participants to rely on each other and the knowledge we create and curate together.

Open and Privacy

Online communication, such as tweets, blog posts, and comments are generally out in the open and technically ‚Äúpublic‚ÄĚ and available for researchers to analyze and quote. Internet researchers have, however, documented how a particular communication may be technically public but viewed by the individual who posted it as meant for a more limited or private context.

Even if an individual feels that they have ‚Äúpublished‚ÄĚ in public or have consented to be part of research, they might still feel like trust has been violated if their words are taken up and re-framed in a way that they feel is out of context or misrepresented. While this study will seek IRB approval, we also have stringent rules around users:

·       We will analyze and publish data that is de-identified or aggregated in ways that cannot be traced back to an individual.

  • Any identifiable quotes or descriptions of activities will not be used in a research publication or presentation without the permission of the individual. This includes anonymized or pseudonymized quotes, because they can be linked back through a search engine to an individual public posting.

Participants may also be contacted and recruited to participate in surveys and interviews for specific research studies. In these cases, we will offer a clear explanation of the consent and privacy procedures, how the data will be used, and what benefit the research will provide to the individual and the community. We will also allow interviewees the opportunity to review transcripts and quotes.

No student will be required to join the study. In fact, someone beside the class instructor will collect permissions and the teaching professor will not know who agreed to be included until grades are submitted.  Participants may be asked to complete an additional consent form that will be reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board..

 

 

Student Audience:

 

At Southern Connecticut State University, we design for a future where there is no separate tech industry, for we embrace the truth of the present that every industry is now a tech industry. Therefore, our entry level class in the program will be offered to all students as part of our Liberal Education Program. This class will focus on the structure of storytelling, character development, and storytelling.

We will fork and also participate in the online class . This distributed learning community is the longest continuously running MOOC  and will connect our Southern students to open web advocates from across the globe. These students will be invited to join our efforts at developing ethical case studies using traditional new media.

All of our Computer Science undergraduate and graduate students take a class in computer ethics. All the case studies developed as part of this grant will be deployed in this class to be used by all of our computer science classes.

We will also revise our graduate level ethical hacking class to include case studies specifically around the ethics of privacy and security. Every computer science graduate class offers this program.

We will also develop and propose a new class on learning A-Frame and WebVR. While students will not complete case studies in this class, they will take storyboards and scripts students wrote in DS106, apply greater disciplinary and tier-three academic language, then develop the webVR files using the editing studio funded by this grant.

 

All the material we create from this class, including participant blogs, will be made openly available on the Glitch platform and GitHub. We have already started to work with collaborators who have created A-Frame tutorials and host these files on Glitch as well. Participants will maintain the right to license their content  however they choose.

This strategy of providing locally curated content that we also open to the web at large will lead to the greatest number of students to be involved in the grant. Working openly also provides a greater voice for our students to get involved in the design of the classes and the projects. The SCSU computer science club has expressed an interest and reported to the department they would like instruction in virtual reality. Any student member can join the steering committee simply by showing up to a meeting or filing a pull request on the team repo.

We also hope computer science, philosophy, business or education schools take up and use the case studies developed by our students. While we believe the learning and knowledge students gain by creating, editing and animating their videos will lead to greater knowledge growth, we will also develop the curriculum for programs that would just like to utilize our series of case studies.

The tutorials on A-Frame and WebVR that we will develop in conjunction with the Mozilla Virtual Reality community will also reach thousands. Having  tutorials framed around e ethics will further reinforce the concept that diversity and inclusion need to be a first design principle.

While traditional instructional design places a priority on learning objectives, ethics in computer science can never work this way. Inclusion should never be a rubric. No one should get a ‚Äú2.7 proficient in diversity‚ÄĚ score. Creating a culture of ethics as a first principle of design requires us to reshape society and not learners.

As Gary Stager points out (2005 pg 3), a focus on instructionalism, the measurable objective, direct instruction, forced response assessment, in education using the web leads to "delivering re-purposed content to students via the Internet. Communication, collaboration, community and construction are afterthoughts graded onto modern correspondence courses."

This data fetishization is a symptom of society rooted in the same problem that lead to the lack of ethics in computer science. Being inclusive doesn't exist on a Likert scale; it develops on a human scale

Therefore, rather than specific learner objectives, we will work with participants to set their "subjectives" (Cormier, 2015) and let them determine the goals in a class that is

¬∑¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†Collaborative¬†‚Äď everyone, including the instructor, learns together and takes responsibility for everyone else‚Äôs learning.

·       Documented - the processes of learning are more important that the specifics of the knowledge constructed. The learning process, therefore, is documented in the...

·       Open - by exposing learning to colleagues and the public, students take the first steps in taking control of their digital identity and expanding their horizons as connected learners-John Becker, 2016.

Community we create will teach more about ethics than specific content. By utilizing case studies, we can connect with multiple perspectives and allow for growth and self-remediation yet we must live these lessons to the spaces and tools we build.

 

 

Measuring Success:

 

Measuring Success

Space as Variable of Interest

As our focus is more on measuring success in our spaces of learning, we will ask learners to plot how they feel the class supports learners in growing on the following scales:

  • Lead
    • Learn
    • Teach
    • Innovate
    • Evangelize
    • Organize
  • Communicate
    • Inquiry
    • Identify
    • Position
    • Empathize
    • Engage
  • Think
    • Question
    • Reflect
    • Analyze
    • Decide
    • Change
  • Create
    • Build
    • Test
    • Iterate
    • Differentiate
    • Scale

 

We will  will create a simple web app for participants to record not where they feel the majority of students engage with the participatory learning environments. After each class students, will simply click on across each of the four scales. We will use this data to iterate on how we meet our pedagogical goals.

Curating Evidence of Success

Each week all participants will be asked to select a picture and write a brief not explaining how the picture captures how they feel. Using content analysis and semiotic analysis we will explore the visual metaphors participants choose. This will provide evidence of knowledge growth from participants. This task is also designed to reinforce visual thinking in the creation of case studies.

Parsing for Growth

Because A-Frame is written in declarative HTML, we will be able to track knowledge growth by using HTML parsers and a type of metadata called microformats. These will be included in both the case study templates, student blogs, and the A-Frame starter kits.

We will also be able to track the number of changes students make using the history available to us in both Git and Glitch.

Webmention badges

We will also create a platform to issue badges. These have been piloted and successfully deployed. All class instructional pages will accept webmentions. Students will apply for a badge by writing a post in reply to the course explaining how they met criteria. If they met the criteria a webmention badge will be sent in reply to the application and to the student’s badge display page.

Circuit of Reflective Inquiry

Ethics requires a study of self and society through a process of self-remediation and democratic education. As we try to measure success of these efforts in Computer Science, we attempt to use multiple pieces of evidence that still put agency in the learner to focus on their subjectives. In this approach we hope to measure growth through Gee's circuit of reflective action:

We formulate a goal (and the goal could be answering a question) and then we take an action in the world. We see how the world responds to the action, ask ourselves whether this response was good or not for the accomplishment of our goal, and then, if need be, act again on better information or a redefined goal. The circuit of reflective action is an interactive conversation with the world.

Greg McVerry

Challenges in Open Source Blogging Communities

As open source communities we need to keep each other energized and engaged.Many people contribute on volunteer time. Squeezing in opportunities to code around children

2 min read

As open source communities we need to keep each other energized and engaged.Many people contribute on volunteer time. Squeezing in opportunities to code around children and career.

Committment takes love and energy. We allowed a narrative of the loner coder pushing commits from a dark basement to define us for far too long. Let us redefine what open source communities look like in more inclusive terms. Let's build in supports for each other.

Blogging can provide this cathartic release for open source contributors. Yet, how do you we harness a digital hug, encourage friendly games, or allow for creative venting without putting undue pressure on an already busy day?

Use the blogs to uplift the community through fun. Make them simple. Design relevant task.

Blogging Challenges

You can add weekly, daily, or monthly challenges to your community or classroom. These challenges have existed since the dawn of the web. Both open pedagogy classes and open source communities have used have effectively used challenges to keep members engaged.

In this began with a daily shoot with a challenge to post a photo everyday. We ee similar types of games in social media streams all the times, but when playing along from a blog you can rest assure that contributing to your project doesn't mean social media silos get to suck up all of your data. They now have the infamous daily create bank that randomly tweets out a challenge every day.

In the community,  set a goal of having someone release gifts of code or content that is openly licensed well-documented and useful for others throughout the month of December in 2018.

Challenges You Can Try:

  • Six-word memoir-Post your reasons you open source in six words.
  • Daily quote (stay away from picture quotes to allow for inclusion..better yetteach accessibility rules first)
  • Hardest/Latest/First thing you learned
  • First/Latest/Most proud contributions
  • Daily photo challenges
  • 150 words a day/week/month
  • Parent challenge-Share memories or rants of open source work and parenting

You have to create a community around yoru code. Do not expect contributors to stick around pushing commits without the contaigon of fun.

To help try and provide a communal release in your open source community try blogging challenges.

 

Greg McVerry

Great Quote from @gigastacey on why Diverse Teams Lead to Better Web

In college I did have a stalker. It was a very scary experience. I come to technology with a different perspective because of that experience.

1 min read

In college I did have a stalker. It was a very scary experience. I come to technology with a different perspective because of that experience. It is not a matter of techno panic but a matter of self-preservation....lots of people in Silicon Valley who have never had a Stalker. They are not thinking like that. If you get more people involved that have had Diversity improves technology in a way that makes regulation less necessary

TWIG 0:47:50 to 0:49:22

So much insight into why we need diversity and importance of having a code of conduct.

Greg McVerry

Quote from Ursala Franklin on Dangers of Prescriptive Technologies #el30

The acculturation to compliance and conformity has, in turn, accelerated the use of prescriptive technologies in administrative, government, and social services. The same development has

1 min read

The acculturation to compliance and conformity has, in turn, accelerated the use of prescriptive technologies in administrative, government, and social services. The same development has diminished resistance to the programming of people.

 

this diminished resistance is the reason why we need to get people to do the hard work of owning your domain.

Greg McVerry

Quote from Ursula Franklin on Prescriptive Technologies #el30

While we should not forget that these prescriptive technologies are exceedingly effective and efficient, they come with an enormous social mortgage. The mortgage means that

1 min read

While we should not forget that these prescriptive technologies are exceedingly effective and efficient, they come with an enormous social mortgage. The mortgage means that we live in a culture of compliance, that we are ever more conditioned to accept orthodoxy as normal, and to accept that there is only one way of doing ‚Äúit.‚ÄĚ

This sounds a lot like the state of social media and the web

CLMOOC

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