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My quick thoughts, back stage, and rants as I try to Teach kids about the Web while learning how to help others build a better Web.

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Greg McVerry

negotiation of Selfie more a metaphor.2 forces that exist but can not coexist as they both influence our identities, weight of gravity of society, and the quantum mechanics of our own Agency, somehow we mass our me(s)

Greg McVerry

I published another episode of my two minute podcast. Today in the first show of the third season we discuss, "What is Meaning Making" https://jgregorymcverry.com/podcasts/2toPonderSe03Ep01.m4a based off of this reading https://quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com/2020/02/01/the-agency-and-artistry-of-meaning-makers-withi...

Greg McVerry

The agency and artistry of meaning makers within and across digital spaces

artistry to meaning making that has more to do with the meaning maker than the technologies

It is a mistake to believe that there is some kind of precise “mathematic” or “formulaic” rendering that is possible. Meaning making is never precise; it is not a form of exact mapping of sounds or meanings onto text.

The skilled readers in our study engaged in a multi-layered inferential reading process that occurred across the three-dimensional spaces of Internet tex(Coiro & Dobler)

That is, the meaning maker is engaged in constructing selves or multiple persona in the company of others or a form of embodiment — a secondary engagement with or participation in the worlds constructed across or within or by layers of text and other media. The term embodiment is used to denote Csordas’ (1999) use of embodiment — “an existential condition” (p. 143).

we control navigation but new skills

Greg McVerry

@ScottRRocco Motivation and agency improve learning in preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school and , adult learning with teachers no different (maybe a little less mature)

Greg McVerry

@MegsBylsma Promise you might secret plan to writing a book on adult learning is to take a "how to teach preschool" and just name the ideas with bigger words
stickers = microcredentials
sharetime = increasing social presence
I can statements: agency

Greg McVerry

Commercial vendors want to reduce friction which in turn reduces control, agency, and knowledge. We are both correct. From a commercial perspective you design to the lowest common denominator. From a learning perspective you should for new heights

Greg McVerry

are a set of cultural practices that allow us to encode and decode meaning onto the world by utilizing mediated tools to express agency and signify cultural membership

Greg McVerry

Thanks for taking the plunge. I added you to the RSS feed.

Teachers must have their own website. Not only does it make you more competitive, but you also get to model to students how you can take control of your literate identity. Define yourself, don't allow others to control your destiny.

It frightens me that we have handed over so much of the identity work our students do to companies like facebook. We need to model to our students a better way forward. Almost all of the misinformation online spreads through just a few networks. Want to help protect democracy? Control your feeds.

I also believe personal websites allow for expression and agency in ways not always prevalent in class. All this talk of diversity in children's books what about the blogosphere? Tackling digital equity works for most when they can answer, "My url is..." websites, video, and video games with mentors in marginalized communities. It's our only hope.

Then finally you as a teacher educator have a responsibility. In Connecticut by 2020 every child needs Computer Science instruction in grades k12 and all teacher prep programs must include some element. After that point if I was a principal I would never hire a teacher without some specialty skill.

Greg McVerry

Agency, Argumentation, and Blogging

2 min read

Calls to bridge cognitive and social practices when teaching Argumentation. (Reznitskaya & Anderson, 2002) developed Argument Schema Theory. Beach and What's their name (year) called for an integration (cite that). We continue this effort by building our theory of change on the concept of argumentation as discourse.

Argumentation as Discourse

Teaching students the norms of academic writing remains one of the most consistent challenges for teachers of the English language arts. The earliest comprehensive studies of writing instruction at the high school level suggested that most students were taught highly formulaic structures for producing academic argument (Applebee & Langer, 2013, Hillocks, 1986), and that trend has remained consistent over time (Applebee and Langer, Newell et al., 2015). Teaching and learning academic argument, especially in middle and high school settings, often is reduced to formulaic essay structures. In fact, Newell et al’s work (dervied from an IES grant project) suggests that

To clarify: what counts as argumentative writing, indeed what counts as argumentation more generally, is not a given. It is not something that just exists. It is instead a set of social practices deeply embedded in our everyday lives and the social institutions in which we all participate. It is socially constructed through and exists only through teaching and learning (Newell 1)

It is this set of socially constructed teaching practices related to argument writing that we aim to upend by providing students with a domain of their own to write, give and receive feedback, and critically evaluate outside web sources when creating their own arguments.

Writer Efficacy, Agency, and Identity

self-efficacy

agency

identity

Dialogical Discourse

double talk

Community of Writers

community is essential to process writing (Applebee & Langer, 2013; Graham, Fitzgerald, Friedrich, Greene, Kim, & Booth Olson, 2016; Graham, & Perin, 2007; NCTE, 2016; Troia & Olinghouse, 2013; Zemelmann, & Daniels, 1988). Moreover, in writing communities outside of school, community drives all learning (Winn). We believe we have to intentionally design hybrid writing spaces that traverse both the classroom and the lived digital lives of our youth. This study seeks to understand t

Integrating Empirical Research into Phase One

Operationalizing Empirical Research in Phase One

Greg McVerry

Responses on XMCA listserv on question of Implicit and Explicit Knowledge

6 min read

In reply to My convulted stream

Hi Greg,

This question and distinction originally interested me when I was trying to work out what intuition is. "Implicit" hides a variety of meanings and sense, whereas explicit is narrower in range and can be connoted with sign, and hence this aspect can be linked with Vygotsky.  To the extent that I have studied Peirce, his object and interpretant seem to have agreement too.


From wikipedia: "Tolman also promoted the concept known as latent learning first coined by Blodgett (1929)"
Polanyi (1958) referred to tacit knowledge quite extensively.  There were a number of other authors that I read contemporary with Polanyi.

P. I. Zinchenko's (1939) study on voluntary and involuntary learning gives experimental accounts of these two different methods of learning.

Best,
Huw

On the hunt

Keith Johnson, one of the professors on my MA at University of Essex,used the distinction between implicit and explicit on the one hand, and the J.R. Anderson model of DECPRO, PRODEC on the other. He didn't say anything about conditional knowledge, but from Anderson I gather it's something to do with the passive reception/active production distinction (that we Halllidayans reject). 
I never heard him use both of them together, in a matrix, so that there was implicit and explicit declarative knowledge, implicit and explicit procedural knowledge, and implicit and explicit conditional knowledge. But Keith was very GRAMMATICAL. It seems to me that if you apply it to PHONOLOGY, there isn't any reason we can't talk about implicit and explicit declarative knowledge (knowing THAT a sound is a /d/ and not a /t/ implicitly and being able to express that idea in phonological terms) and it is also possible to talk about implicit and explicit procedural knowledge (knowing HOW to distinguish them without thinking about it, and knowing HOW they are distinguished by the movements of the articulators). I don't see any reason in principle why you couldn't do the same thing with conditional knowledge either, although I'm not really sure that all these distinctions are relevant to teaching. 
All of this, and a lot more, in his 19i96 book Skill Learning and Language Teaching (Blackwell).
David KelloggSangmyung University

New Article: Han Hee Jeung & David Kellogg (2019): A story without SELF: Vygotsky’s
pedology, Bruner’s constructivism and Halliday’s construalism in understanding narratives byKorean children, Language and Education, DOI: 10.1080/09500782.2019.1582663To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/09500782.2019.1582663
Some e-prints available at:https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/KHRxrQ4n45t9N2ZHZhQK/full?target=10.1080/09500782.2019.1582663
All of this is in his 1996 book Skill Learning and Language Teaching (Blackwell). Greg,
I'm not sure about implicit *knowledge*, but the earliest studies on implicit *learning* were conducted by Arthur Reber in the 1960s. I had the good fortune of being a graduate student at CUNY Graduate Center in Developmental Psychology in the 1980s when Arthur was there as a visiting scholar. He was studying implicit learning of *grammar* by adults and children. What struck me about the phenomenon (then and now) is that subjects in experiments are unaware that they are engaged in implicit learning - and when asked to think about the task they are performing while they are learning to infer patterns implicitly, their performance deteriorates significantly. It would seem that implicit and explicit learning are activities that conflict with each other.

This info may not be at all relevant to your question, but I thought I should mention it.
Cheers,PeterI think you'd need to qualify that statement, Peter, for it to be correct.
The use of the phrase "involuntary" in P. I. Zinchenko's work pertains to "without volition" rather than "against one's volition".
Best,Huw

mike cole

Jun 14, 2019, 1:05 PM (3 days ago)
   
 

The same distinction can be found usefully in the work of Giyoo Hatano which you might find useful,Greg. A distinction is found in Wright's book on Envisioning Real Utopias between ideologyand culture.
Odd query:  Earth worms have an enormous effect on their environments and hence ours. Earth worms could not do this if they did not have "wiggle room." Would you attribute thetunnels and soil transformation of earth worms to them "having" agency? 

Also, I believe Palermo and Weiner made this distinction in the late 70s.  I would check their classic textbook on cognitive psychology (if it’s still around.)  And, Polanyi addressed these issues too.  Best, ag

 

Artin Goncu, Ph.D

Professor, Emeritus

University of Illinois at Chicago

www.artingoncu.com/

Can the earthworms consider the consequences of wiggiling this way or that and predicting the consequences of these choices or do they follow an almost programmatic biological following. If so is this agency and still learning in emodoed ways? 
I do keep a worm box those worms are more than cared for but not free? Are they missing agency?
----------I think I will disagree. Bits of explicit learning embedded into implicit events when you have explicit goals make a difference.
Meaning in the two spaces I am studying and people engage in explicit learning all the time. They need to make a gif or learn CSS. 
Yet other times folks muck about trying new things.
In each of these events people may have an overarching goal... As I type I am drawn to Dewey and Art and Experience. 
I do find embedding skills in a passion whrn I teach web development is key. Is Passion implicit learning or the most explicit imaginable?

Yes, when there is even flow, you feel entirely free, its our way or the highway. :-)And yes to dewey!

mike

Kind of why I wish I did not have to name things. Just say they "learn" then we don't cut knowledge off to the world.
I am going to try to grab thos thread and concurrent threads on Twitter and try to mix them together 
Thank you to all, All the books in thread requested through my library. 

 

Vygotsky showed in his work on child development (Problem of Age, for example) that the will is not born free all at once, and is in fact never free absolutely. Hegel gives us an extended discourse on free will in The Philosophy of Right, beginning with the transformation of the 'natural will' into the 'free will' with the creatures who use culture to control their own activity. But is takes social transformation to take the will beyond a Spinozan/Stoic resignation.

Nature-given drives and culture-given norms do not cancel freedom of will absolutely, but I think it makes no sense to talk about "agency" or freedom of the will other than actions passing through consciousness, with or without conscious awareness. But of course, if you are an Althusserian or Foucauldian, "agency" is taken in the sense of being the unwitting agent transmitting a disease, under which meaning, the earthworm has as much agency as Napoleon.

Andy

https://www.ethicalpolitics.org/ablunden/pdfs/Article_on_Teleology.pdf

CLMOOC

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