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My quick thoughts, back stage, and rants as I try to Teach kids about the Web while learning how to help others build a better Web.

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Greg McVerry

Tracing the Shape of Research in #edu106

1 min read

As we explore ways in to tell our stories we have also delved into the shape of other tales. Today we looked at the shape of the research article.

Student reading article on laptop

Students got into groups and then tried to trace the shape of the article.

chart paper with a spider web diagram

three students collaborating on chart paper

students reading together

spider diagram by studentsWe then discussed how the genre of research like a fable has a very common pattern to follow. Next we defined key terms students may come across when reading research.

descrpitive statistics and their definitions on a white board

Overall it was a fun day of learning. I found it quite invaluable to have students dissect the text structure of a research article and then define key terms educators will come across.

Greg McVerry

This is the worst headline about learning ever https://www.theladders.com/career-advice/how-to-accelerate-your-learning-curve-to-10x-your-personal-... based on 0% of learning sciences research.

Greg McVerry

@reneehobbes what book on media, storytelling, and children shoudl I assign in my children's lit class? I like Research to practice piece but any good children and media literacy story. Gonna do a unit on toys using bunch of Dyson for that

Greg McVerry

@mweller What if I research influencers?

Greg McVerry

Planning the first #edu106 module

3 min read

Tell Your Story
2019-09-04-2019 until 2019-10-02

Goal Build a website to share media you create to tell your story.

Objectives:
Examine the selfie as an artifact of identity
Explore learner identities and the impact this has on learning.
Explore the impact learning and education have on identitied.
Annotate a research article for descriptive statistics

Key Vocabulary:
Bell Curve, Kurtosis, Skewness, D(d)iscourses, remix, creative commons

Technology Fluency 1 stuff hit:


Activities
3 daily creates a week: http://tdc.ds106.us/

learning activities
shapes of stories
Read
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oP3c1h8v2ZQ&feature=youtu.be
Write
    Think of a story you know well- a novel, a song, a TV show, and see if you can create an diagram showing the shape of that story, and annotate it as well with plot points at key points on the curve. You can do this in graphic software or sketch on a piece of paper and take a digital photo of your curve.

    Write a blog post that describes how that shape influences the effectiveness of the story and tag/label it as storyshape (see what happens with that link as more people publish their posts).
Participate
    Now that you’ve considered the shape of a story, meet with a group and choose  other forms of communication you do might have a “shape” – what is the shape of an email message? a syllabus? a lesson plan? a research paper? a conference presentation?

    Think about how you might apply some of the ideas from story shape to these forms of communication. Each person should blog about the communication format before you discuss the shape. Then comment back and forth on each other's post.
Selfies and Identities
Read
     Amber Case’s “We Are All Cyborgs Now” & Read “The Selfie & and Self”
     https://www.buzzfeed.com/annehelenpetersen/the-track-everything-revolution-is-here-to-improve-you-wh...
schools and identities
Read
     boyd, d. (2014). It’s Complicated: the social lives of networked teens. Yale University Press. Chapters 1 and 2.
     Donna Alvermann Reading Adolescents Reading Identities
     John Dewey: Chapter 1:The School and Social Progress
Write
    Did you have a good identity as a learner? OR Write a story about two people one who has a positive view of learning and school and one does not. Explore their backstory to explain this world view.
Participate:
    Complete threee daily creates a week.
Make Cycles
    Every week there will be something for you to create.
         4-11  Make Cycle One: Selfie
         11-18 Make Cycle Two: Build Your Website
         18-25 Make Cycle Three: Timeline
         25-2  Make Cycle Four: Customixe Your Site


Greg McVerry

Greg McVerry

Back to work on the research plan with @troyhicks and @shabrams: http://jgregorymcverry.com/questionthewebresearchplan.html

Greg McVerry

Spending my Saturday morning redoing the research plan of : http://jgregorymcverry.com/questionthewebresearchplan.html already cut the chatbots which saddens me, I think we can play a lot with microformats and HTML parsers to provide scaffolds to student writing

Greg McVerry

Trying to Define Digital #literacies on wikipedia

4 min read

I am trying to fix the digital literacy article on Wikipedia. Here is the current definition:

Digital literacy refers to an individual's ability to find, evaluate, and compose clear information through writing and other mediums on various digital platforms. Digital literacy is evaluated by an individual's grammar, composition, typing skills and ability to produce writings, images, audio and designs using technology. While digital literacy initially focused on digital skills and stand-alone computers, the advent of the Internet and use of social media, has caused some of its focus to shift to mobile devices. Digital literacy does not replace traditional forms of literacy, instead building upon the skills that form the foundation of traditional forms of literacy.[1]

Digital literacy built on the expanding role of social science research in the field of literacy[2] as well on concepts of visual literacy [3], computer literacy [4], and information literacy, [5]

Overall digital literacy shares many defining principles with other fields that use modifiers in front of literacy to define ways of being and domain specific knowledge. The term has grown in popularity in education and higher education settings and can be found used in International and national standards [6]. Similar to other expanding definitions of literacy that recognize cultural and historical ways of making meaning [7] digital literacy does not replace traditional forms of literacy, instead building upon the skills that form the foundation of traditional forms of literacy.[1]

I have issues with this mainly as it draws only from information processing models of research yet in the second paragraph discussed the social sciences used. Specifically the current dfn is only relying on an informational retrieval model.

I know of few scholars who still use an IR perspective for digital literacy...and I studied at the New Literacies Research Lab...probably the most cognitive approaches to digital literacy. Don, studied under Jean Chall and we studied under him.You can't get much more old school than that.

Online reading comprehension was a cognitive approach whereas most other literacy researchers used much stronger socio-cultural approaches. Thus to define digital literacy from an IR perspective makes little sense.

The only citation to defining the term is Henry Jenkins book on Participatory culture. I love the text but it is not the go to guide for defining digital literacies. It is tangentially connected.

The discussion of mobile devices as a shift in the definition does not fit in a dfn nor is the claim supported.

Much of our ideas in the third paragraph remain, and it is too confusing and still needs work. I will agree with the other editors there.

Here was our edit:

Digital literacy, also known as digital literacies[1], refers to the shared cultural practices of encoding and decoding meaning on the world[2] through multiple modalities produced or transferred using information digitally recorded and stored . Digital literacies encompass a bricolage of skills, attitudes, and dispositions as participants negotiate meaning and identity[3] in a networked society [4]and may include, but is not limited to, an individual's grammar, composition, writings, images, audio, video, podcasting, remixing and designs using technology.

Digital literacy, first coined in 1997 by Paul Gilster [5] built on the expanding role of anthropological research in the field of literacy[6] as well on concepts of visual literacy [7], computer literacy [8], and information literacy, [9]

Overall digital literacy shares many defining principles with other fields that use modifiers in front of literacy to define ways of being and domain specific knowledge. The term has grown in popularity in education and higher education settings and can be found used in International and national standards [10]. Similar to other expanding definitions of literacy that recognize cultural and historical ways of making meaning [11] digital literacy does not replace traditional forms of literacy, instead building upon the skills that form the foundation of traditional forms of literacy.[12]

I feel this is better cited and combines both cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives on reading. I lead with a sociocultural perspective as it reflects the current state of literature and where the work of digital literacies happens. In terms of citations I added Belshaw (wrote the book on Digital Literacy). Lanksher and Knobel (new literacies anyone), and Gillchrist (coined the term)

Other editors felt my revision is too confusing. Maybe I did use too much jargon and flowery metaphors (bricolage) yet I do not think the constant reversion of my edits is the best approach. Wikipedia works better when we revise rather than reject edit.

Greg McVerry

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